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Marriott Wardman Park Hotel

2660 Woodley Rd NW

Washington, DC 20008

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President Trump has courted controversy over pipelines infringing on Native American sovereignty, immigration, climate change, healthcare, and even torture. Vibrant social movements and intersectional political projects have emerged as a result. Anthropologists have been conducting hackathons to save environmental data from Trump, Standing with Standing Rock, proudly rallying in the streets with the Women’s March on Washington, and working in solidarity with #BlackLivesMatter. There is an opportunity to forge new political coalitions with elected officials who are currently in power. “The state of emergency is also always a state of emergence,” according to Homi Bhabha.

Take part in a discussion about how anthropological expertise might influence Congressional policy under the Trump administration. This special event will present practical tips, from Congressional staff members, about effective advocacy. Before coming to Washington, consider calling the Congressional Switchboard to set up a meeting with the staff of your elected officials in the House of Representatives and the Senate (202-224-3121). An emergent group of anthropologists, the Congressional Action Network has identified several Congressional policy initiatives of broad importance to anthropologists and will be issuing periodic calls for action leading up to the AAA Annual Meetings in November in Washington DC and beyond. This special event will be an opportunity for members to learn about existing initiatives and also learn about using your own expertise to feed forward into future initiatives.

Anthropologists came together in May 2017 for a two-day workshop in Washington D.C. to discuss the contemporary political landscape in the United States and consider how anthropological perspectives might inform Federal policy. Anthropological experts on Islamophobia, the military, reproductive rights, immigration, queer theory, racism, the environment, human rights, and medicine came together to discuss intersectional politics. An archaeologist who was a national coordinator of the Women’s March on Washington discussed how contemporary social movements are interfacing with conventional political structures. An ethnographer who studies informal power and elite influence in Washington D.C. offered insights about the current historical moment. This group fanned out into the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate for over forty meetings with Congressional officials.

This special event, Congressional Advocacy 101, will be paired with an Executive Session on “Reimagining Political Horizons,” where some participants in the May meeting will discuss theoretical insights about power. If some social movements refuse to engage with elected politicians, rejecting existing power structures in the name of a future-to-come, other movements are becoming increasingly savvy at influencing concrete policy outcomes.

This workshop is free and open to all members of the American Anthropological Association (AAA). Please register on Eventbrite to ensure a seat and to receive updates about congressional advocacy as the November meetings approach.

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Marriott Wardman Park Hotel

2660 Woodley Rd NW

Washington, DC 20008

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