$25 – $50

Community Accountability for Consent Violations in Dance Communities

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A workshop exploring what community accountability looks like when boundaries are crossed within tight-knit dance and flow arts communities.

About this Event

Workshop will be limited to 20 attendees.

Join us June 9 from 3:00-6:00 pm at The Flowjo in Carrboro to explore community accountability for consent violations.

This workshop will explore community accountability in flow arts, ecstatic dance, and other small, tight-knit communities when boundaries will inevitably be crossed. Attendees will learn to differentiate between unintentional violations and patterns of power and control, and the gendered, cultural factors that shape how these violations play out in communities. We will practice and learn basic listening and response skills for supporting survivors. Attendees will learn the difference between restorative justice and transformative justice, why mediation/facilitation is generally an inappropriate response to sexual or partner violations, and how restorative and transformative justice processes can be modified to be appropriate for sexual and partner violations. We will have a facilitated, exploratory dialogue about how to process and hold space when we find out a close friend or admired colleague has been violated or violated someone else, and ways to respond to having your own violation of somebody's boundaries brought to your attention. Attendees will leave better prepared to hold space for healing for both survivors and harm-doers in their communities.

This workshop is not a transformative justice or mediation process, and we will not be attempting to resolve any specific, real-life violations over the course of this workshop. Nor is it a training to facilitate or lead mediation or transformative justice processes, as the Triangle (especially Durham!) is chock-full of experienced accountability facilitators. Rather, it is a training designed to help community members hold space for and respond to survivors and harm-doers in their communities, and to be better-informed, critical consumers of the accountability options available to them. It is less about answers, and more about how to engage in informed processes.

Class is capped at 20 participants, so pre-registration through eventbrite is recommended at $25-50 sliding scale and may be paid in person if class is still open. We don't want money to be a reason for some one to be turned away, so if money is an issue and you have a powerful call to attend, please email me in advance of the workshop at christy.croft@icloud.com. A handful of spots will be reserved on a first-come, first served basis for less resourced attendees. Email for information.

About your facilitators:

Christy Croft is an independent consent and sexuality educator, writer, and queer organizer who also works a full-time day job as a training and technical assistance provider for anti-sexual violence nonprofits, in which she spent a decade as a crisis responder and support group facilitator. She has been involved in community accountability processes as both an advocate and a participant. She holds an interdisciplinary Master’s degree that focused on global human rights, gender theory, and religion, is an experienced and creative ritualist, and regularly guest lectures at local queer theology and gender studies classes. She is a pleasure activist, a giant nerd, and a survivor of all the things, and is radically unapologetic about her sometimes-conflicting identities. In her free time, she dances, swims in rivers, writes, protests, sings bad karaoke, and is a hobbyist hooper and fire performer. You can find more of her work at www.christycroft.com

Christy's entire teacher pay from this workshop is being donated to organizations and women of color who have helped me grow in my understanding of what community accountability can look like.

Bakari Roscoe is an educator with a background in science, math and art education. He is currently pursuing an associates in arts at Durham Technical Community College, previously attended Bunker Hill Community College, and works part-time in K-12 Arts education. He is an experienced organizer around food accessibility, harm reduction, and LGBTQIA rights, and is passionate about the intersectionality of human experiences and various frameworks of understanding and looking at them. In his free time, he likes to garden, read, play chess, and cook. In the past, Bakari Has worked as a political fundraiser, dishwasher/waiter/bartender, sailor/rigger, tutor, and in the art galleries and museums.

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