CELEBRATE HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH: FROM MEXICAN CORRIDOS TO TEJANO MUSIC

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CELEBRATE HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH: FROM MEXICAN CORRIDOS TO TEJANO MUSIC

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month! Explore The Evolution of Mexican Corrido Music to present day Tejano Music with Dr. Alejandro Benavides .

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Date and time

Location

THE VENUE 21 South Broadway Aurora, IL 60505

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About this event

The Venue is pleased to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with an educational lecture by Dr. Alejandro Benavides exploring the history of working-class Mexican music, followed by a performance of Tejano music and dancing.

Sunday, October 2, 6pm. Doors open 5pm.

This is a FREE event, but patrons are asked to reserve seats.

Lecture 6p - 7:15p | Break | Music & Dancing 7:30p - 9p

Patrons are encouraged to bring in their own snacks and bites from area restaurants to enjoy during the performance, however no outside beverages of any kind are allowed. All types of beer, wine, assorted cocktails and soft drinks are available for purchase at The Venue service window.

FROM MEXICAN CORRIDO MUSIC TO TEJANO MUSIC IN AURORA, ILLINOIS

The presentation by Dr. Alejandro Benavides, local author and retired educator, consists of a narrative and audio–visuals on the evolution of corrido music to present–day tejano music. Followed by a Tejano conjunto performance of numerous musical styles along with demonstrations of Tejano dances.

ABOUT CORRIDO MUSIC

Corrido music is an epic–lyric–narrative genre which evolved in Mexico and along the southern U.S. border. During the Mexican Revolution, between 1910–1920, corrido’s entertained poor people and provided oral accounts through musical ballads of major political and social events, catastrophes, the Mexican Revolution and major battles, folk heroes and outlaws, and traditional romantic songs. Corrido songs preserved the oral history of events from that time to post-Revolution corridos and narratives. Corridos were performed by conjuntos, usually consisting of a traveling three–man band, with a guitar or two, and fiddle. During the mid–19th century, as conjuntos from Mexico traveled to Texas, they adopted musical instruments and music such as the polka and waltzes from German, Polish, and Czech immigrants. Their music evolved into a new genre of “musica norteña”—"northern music”—that became synonymous the “Texas–Mexican” conjunto music for working–class people. Within time, conjunto performers created new “tejano” music styles with additional instruments which became standard features during its “golden years.” Tejano “border” music included traditional “rancheras” which embraces rural and romantic themes sung in a verity of tempos and rhythms.

THE AURORA CONNECTION

People from Mexico started arriving in Aurora during the early 1900’s in search of the American Dream. They listened to traditional music from Mexico through radios and at local “Mexican dances.” Beginning in 1950, Americans of Mexican ancestry known as tejanos migrated from southern Texas to Aurora, many were former migrant–farm worker. Within a decade, tejanos formed a social club and established a community within Aurora that embraced and preserved tejano music as part of their culture. By the 1960s, a new era on Texas–Mexican conjunto grew in popularity with the blending of instruments and music forms, including jazz. Large conjunto orchestra performances became popular. New conjuntos and music styles grew in prominence as the Mexican–American population increased, especially in the Southwest. Tejano music remains popular in the Fox Valley and throughout the United States.

ABOUT THE BAND

To be announced.

CELEBRATE HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH: FROM MEXICAN CORRIDOS TO TEJANO MUSIC image

Dr. Alejandro Benavides