$35 – $375

Body-Mind Approaches to Building Resilience

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The Interfaith Center of New York

475 Riverside Dr

#540

New York, NY 10115

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Building Resilience in Young Children and Their Families: Body-Mind Approaches

Infants and young children learn about the world and express themselves through sensation and movement before they develop language. This conference focuses on the rich nonverbal dimensions of both children’s and parents’ experiences. Our presenters will explore how sensory processing affects development and how touch, handling, and movement facilitation enhance a child’s capacities to self-regulate and build relationships. We will examine the nuances of nonverbal communication between parents and their children and share interventions to improve parent-child relationships and build resilience. We will highlight the importance of an inter-cultural framework to understand these relationships and will consider how childhood experiences of both professionals and parents impact their work and relationships.

We are pleased to be able to offer social work and education CEUs/CTLEs for participation in this year's conference! Beverages and lunch will be provided.

Friday, May 11, 2018
8:30AM - 3:30PM
The Interfaith Center of New York
475 Riverside Drive
New York, NY 10115

Registration:
  • $100 for members
  • $130 for non-member
  • $95 for group registration (current organizational membership + 5 or more registered)
  • $50 for students
  • $35 for remote livestream of the plenary sessions (Please note that NO CEUs or CTLEs are available for the livestream option.)

Plenary Session One: How the Body Speaks: The Nonverbal Cues of Trauma Between Mother and Baby

Presented by Suzi Tortora, Ed.D., BC-DMT, LCAT, LMHC and Daniel Schechter, M.D., Habil., DFAACAP

Dr. Schechter will present video excerpts from his research in Geneva and New York of mothers suffering from interpersonal violence-related posttraumatic stress disorder (IPV-PTSD) and their toddlers, along with similar videos of non-traumatized controls. Dr. Tortora will provide an analysis of nonverbal communication in both dyadic groups. Their dialogue will focus on what can be known and not as well known from the nonverbal reading. Implications for treatment will be discussed.

Learning objectives:

  • Learn what mothers with IPV-PTSD must contend with in terms of their own dysregulation of emotion and arousal at different levels in response to stressors in their environment that include their young child and relationship with him/her during routine stressful moments.
  • Learn about how this dysregulation impacts the mother-child relationship and how these mothers’ toddlers both adapt to and influence their caregivers, as well as what happens when they are additionally directly exposed to IPV.
  • Learn three nonverbal movement analysis categories that provide insight into the nature of the mother-child attachment relationship within this vulnerable group of mothers and their toddlers.
  • Learn how to apply nonverbal analysis findings to create intervention strategies that support improved mother-child interactions.


Plenary Session Two: Sensation: A Vital Link in Development

Presented by Gilbert M. Foley, Ed.D.


Sensation as stimulus nurturance is a vital ingredient and link in the development of many capacities in infancy and early childhood. This presentation explores the concept of sensory processing and its contributions to infant and early childhood mental health, motor competence, and learning. When sensory processing capacity is compromised, it can undermine competence in these domains as well, which will be examined in concept and by clinical example. How an understanding of sensory processing disorder can contribute insights and alternative hypotheses to explaining and formulating developmental and mental health challenges in young children will be illustrated.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the key developmental links between sensory processing and social emotional, movement and learning domains.
  • Define the 3 primary types of sensory processing disorder with video illustration.
  • Explain by clinical example sensory processing contributions to mental health challenges in young children.


Breakout Session One: Intercultural Considerations and Their Impact on the Social-Emotional Needs of Children and Their Families

Featuring Renee Ortega, MS, BC-DMT, LCAT, COTA/L, SIPT

Participants will be provided a brief overview of intercultural communication, its importance in the therapeutic relationship and supporting the social-emotional needs of the child and family. Through case study, participants will be able to explore the benefits of being inter-culturally aware and competent in the therapeutic relationship to better support the diverse needs of the child and family. Strategies for improved intercultural competency and awareness will be shared. Time for questions and answers will be provided.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will understand the crucial role that intercultural communication and awareness play in child and family work.
  • Participants will explore through case study the benefits of intercultural competency and its impact on the therapeutic relationship.
  • Participants will learn strategies for integrating intercultural communication into their work with children and families.

Breakout Session Two: Adverse Childhood Experiences in Professionals Working with Young Children and Families: Building Understanding and Resiliency

Featuring Margie Brickley, MSEd, IMH Endorsement IV, Robin Hancock, Ph.D., and Gabriel Guyton, MSEd, MA

This session will focus on the childhood experiences of people working with young children. The discussion will build on research that assessed ACEs in teachers in New York City and rural North Carolina. Presenters will share how reflective practice, coaching and courses identify ACEs and build resiliency in a variety of settings. Voices from the teachers, graduate students and social workers in the field will be highlighted.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will understand the role ACEs play in the work professionals do with children and families.
  • Participants will be able to identity strategies to build resilience.
  • Participants will consider which strategies would be useful in their context.

Breakout Session Three: Integrating Mind and Body in Responding to Children’s Challenging Behaviors

Featuring Sabina Fila, LCSW, and Genoveva Garcia, LCSW

When faced with challenging behavior parents and child care providers often experience a rush of reactions which, if decoded, can be quite helpful in their ability to step back and respond with more freedom and intentionality to the situation at hand.
During this breakout session, we will lead the participants through some experiential exercises which will develop awareness of their body sensations, thoughts, and feelings when triggered and when resourced. We will then present some real-life situations and see how this greater awareness may be helpful in dealing constructively with them.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will develop awareness of how our body and mind offer important information in decoding our reactions.
  • Participants will experience going from a place of mind and body activation to a place of resourcing.
  • Participants will put into practice 1. and 2. through applying it in real life situations through vignettes or videos.

Breakout Session Four: Infant Developmental Movement Education (IDME): An Approach to Touch, Handling and Movement Facilitation for Infants from Birth to Walking

Featuring Amy Matthews, BA, CMA, IDME and Sarah Barnaby, BA, IDME

How we touch, handle and move a baby affects all aspects of development: their patterns of perception, their problem-solving abilities, their emotional well-being, cognitive functioning, and their sense of agency in the world. When we support a child in cycling between extension and flexion and between outward and inward attention, we are also supporting their ability to self-soothe and self-regulate, and to relate to themselves and others throughout their life.
When a baby finds their way to a new movement skill through their own agency, directed by their curiosity and in their own timing, they can more fully own the skill and build upon it. A child’s process of learning a new movement is not only about getting the skill itself – it’s about learning how to learn.
In this session, through a combination of discussion, demonstration and practice, we’ll explore principles and techniques that we use and teach to caregivers to help a baby feel safe and oriented, to facilitate their movement development, and to return to flexion as a home base.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about an approach to infant touch and handling that is based on principles of Body-Mind Centering® that include valuing process over milestones and respecting each child’s timing.
  • Learn specific touch and handling techniques that support a baby’s sense of safety, orientation, comfort and bonding.
  • Understand the value of midline, flexion, and ‘baby ball’ in sensory integration, balancing tone, and supporting self-regulation at all developmental stages.
  • Understand how a baby’s experience of all four horizontal positions supports:
    • orienting to midline
    • learning to roll
    • righting their head
    • transitioning into and out of vertical positions (sitting, standing, etc.)
    • learning to crawl, sit, stand, walk, climb

Breakout Session Five: The Moving Child

Featuring Suzi Tortora, Ed.D., BC-DMT, LCAT, LMHC

This workshop will present The Moving Child movie (www.themovingchild.com), demonstrating how moving in relationship with caregivers, as well as supporting children to explore and discover movement on their own, supports their social, emotional, physical, communicative, and mental health. It will be followed by a discussion about the importance of dynamic movement in early childhood development as a way to support the parent-infant attachment relationship.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe three ways movement/motor development through self-exploration supports the growing infant’s emotional, social, cognitive and communicative development.
  • Understand how caregivers can support infant early childhood movement and motor development.
  • Understand the importance of dynamic movement in early childhood development as a way to support the parent-infant attachment relationships.


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Date and Time

Location

The Interfaith Center of New York

475 Riverside Dr

#540

New York, NY 10115

View Map

Refund Policy

No Refunds

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