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Antiracist Educator Summer Series

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Seven weekly workshops that provide educators with the abilities necessary to create and sustain antiracist classrooms and schools.

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How different would antiracism efforts in schools look if we deeply understood how racism operates, not just interpersonally, but institutionally? How different would they look if we committed to moving those efforts at the pace of the people most desperate for racial justice rather than progressing at the pace of the people most resistant to it? What if we stretched our baby steps and took more serious leaps toward antiracism?

In this series, hosted by the Equity Literacy Institute and Due East Educational Equity Collaborative, we offer seven weekly workshops designed to provide educators with the knowledge, abilities, and will necessary to create and sustain antiracist classrooms, schools, and districts—to leap over Diversity Lite and toward racial justice education. Topics include humanizing blackness in schools, teaching antiracism in P-12 classrooms, embracing a systems view of antiracist education, understanding and managing resistance to antiracism commitments, and more. Join Kass and Cornelius Minor, Taharee Jackson, Marceline DuBose, Paul Gorski, Seema Pothini, and many other powerful facilitators for this transformative series.

7 Thursday Evenings this Summer! (7:00-8:15PM EST)

Schedule of Sessions: (full session descriptions below)

June 10th, Paul Gorski, From Equity-Posing to Antiracist Doing: Embracing a Transformative Approach to Antiracism in Schools

June 17, Taharee Jackson, "But I'm Oppressed Too!" Identity-Based Pitfalls in Antiracism and Anti-Oppression

June 24th, Kass and Cornelius Minor, Operational Antiracism: The movement to decolonize your classroom and your pedagogy one period at a time

July 8th, Seema Pothini, No More, "Next Time." Using student voice to help you recognize, respond to, & redress racism & bias in the moment.

July 15th, Katy Swalwell, "That's Actually Worse": How Curriculum About Anti-Racist Social Movements Can Still Be Racist

July 22nd, Eghosa Obaizamomwan Hamilton and T. Gertrude Jenkins, Recognizing, Emphasizing and Humanizing Blackness in Schools

July 29th, Marceline DuBose and Tess Ormseth, Navigating Resistance and Building Strong Coalitions to Transform Schools for Racial Justice and Equity

All sessions will be recorded. A link to the recording of each session will be to registrants the day after it is recorded. So, if you have to miss all or part of any session, you will still be able to see it. Note that recordings will be available for only one week, then taken down.

SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

June 10: From Equity-Posing to Antiracist Doing: Embracing a Transformative Approach to Antiracism in Schools

The biggest barrier to racial justice in most schools and districts is not the scarcity of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) programs and initiatives, but the tendency for those initiatives to fall far short of the goal of identify and eliminating racism. In this session we will set the stage for the rest of the series by establishing a clear, transformative vision for antiracism in education. We’ll discuss transformative basics, like moving from a reactive approach to “racist incidents” to a proactive approach for eliminating racism and cultivating antiracism in classrooms and schools. We’ll also explore common “equity-posing” and racial equity “detours” educators sometimes embrace as a way to create the illusion of DEI progress while leaving the root causes of disparities and injustice undisturbed. We will end by discussing a series of basic antiracist values and commitments that, in our experience, put educators and schools on a promising track toward antiracism.

June 17: "But I'm Oppressed Too!" Identity-Based Pitfalls in Antiracism and Anti-Oppression

The greatest opportunity in antiracism and anti-oppression work is using the totality of our own experiences to develop empathy, to take on the perspectives of historically excluded others, and to understand the oppression of marginalized groups. We can, however, corrupt the racial dialogue with false equivalencies, "we suffer the same way" tropes, and All Lives Matter arguments. This session will address some of the most intractable ideologies undergirding antiracist and anti-oppressive dialogues that become derailed, deflected, and detoured. Participants will learn strategies for engaging in the deep personal identity work, skilled racial dialogue, and responses to racial resistance in education and everyday dialogue. Meritocracy, equity, and racial parity will be discussed.

June 24: Operational Antiracism: The movement to decolonize your classroom and your pedagogy one period at a time

Antiracism has been a popular concept, but there are too many classrooms where progressive ideas have been employed in colonial ways. In this workshop, Kass and Cornelius will name tensions between study groups and active teaching, between goodwill and implicit support of systems that have marginalized kids for generations, and between liberation and popular community expectations.

July 8: No More, "Next Time." Using student voice to help you recognize, respond to, & redress racism & bias in the moment.

Have you been in a situation where an inequity is at play but you don't know how to address it? Do you know of inequities in your school or organization but don't feel that you have the will or skill to bring it up to others? This workshop will give you tools to feel inspired and empowered to address bias, racism, or any other type of injustice immediately and effectively. We'll also model and discuss ways in which you can use student voice to educate yourself and others without re-traumatizing marginalized students in the process. Youth need your advocacy and disruption of systemic barriers now, without waiting for "the next time."

July 15: "That's Actually Worse": How Curriculum About Anti-Racist Social Movements Can Still Be Racist

Every elementary and high school social studies curriculum includes examples of content that many teachers presume is inherently anti-racist because it centers the stories of anti-racist social movements (e.g., the Civil Rights Movement). Frustratingly, it is all too common for educators to teach students about people, events, and tactics in ways that whitewash the past, center whiteness, and reproduce racism. This session helps participants develop a critical lens when adopting or developing curriculum for this type of content, and shares resources for teaching about anti-racist social movements in genuinely anti-racist ways.

July 22: Recognizing, Emphasizing and Humanizing Blackness in Schools

Have you observed that the Black experience and Black thought is limited to a few people or events—usually historical—within traditional curriculum? Have you seen or heard negative stereotypes about Blackness, Black people, Black students, or Black families perpetuated in school? Have you noticed that schools are not as connected with or responsive to Black students and families? Have you seen white students and other students of color misinformed and/or biased against Blackness? These are all examples of anti-Blackness (a potent factor in societal racism, injustice and inequity) which shows up in our schools, both unconsciously and overtly. Have you wondered why this is happening? And how to transform schools to be places that recognize and humanize Blackness? In this session, participants take a deep dive into anti-Blackness and the myriad ways it is perpetuated in our schools. Participants unpack the complexities of anti-Black messaging by engaging in robust discussions that allow them to (1) identify acts of anti-Blackness, (2) own the ways in which we as educators uphold anti-Blackness in our pedagogies, and (3) determine ways in which to challenge school systems and practices that are anti-Black. Session participants leave with tools to develop initiatives in their classrooms and at their specific school sites that recognize, emphasize and humanize Blackness. The overall goal of this session is to assist educators and school-leaders in creating anti-racist, equity-based classrooms and school systems that produce equity and justice minded global citizens.

July 29: Navigating Resistance and Building Strong Coalitions to Transform Schools for Racial Justice and Equity

As racial justice facilitators, coaches, and leaders we have consciously signed up to join the coalition to shift unjust systems, alter historical trajectories, and hopefully undo generations of oppressive ideologies. We do this with the understanding that systems and societies are made up of individual people, so our “work” is with people. People do not shift their ideologies easily nor very often willingly, so as equity and social justice leaders we need to expect and plan for resistance. In this session, participants will learn to identify and name common types of resistance and practice engaging in productive dialogue to navigate through it. We will also discuss strategies for the moments when dialogue may not be productive and how to shut down the resistance. Through discussion, personal reflection, and a case study, participants will leave this session better prepared to effectively address resistance in their sphere of influence.

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