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A Place To Bury Strangers @ GAMH w/ Sextile, Prettiest Eyes

Great American Music Hall

Sunday, June 10, 2018 at 7:00 PM (PDT)

A Place To Bury Strangers @ GAMH   w/ Sextile,...

Ticket Information

Ticket Type Sales End Price Fee Quantity
ADVANCE - show @ 8pm
General Admission. Limited seating, mostly standing.
NOTE: As long as the show has not sold out, tickets can be purchased directly from the Slim's or GAMH box offices with no service charge.
Jun 10, 2018 $17.00 $7.19
DOOR - show @ 8pm
Night of show ticket price. General Admission. Limited seating, mostly standing.
NOTE: Unless the show has sold out, tickets can be purchased without a service fee at the box office on the night of show. If the show sells out in advance, these tickets will not go on sale.
Not Started $21.00 $7.43
DINNER + ADMISSION - show @ 8pm
Reserved Section. Dinner ticket includes:
1.) Priority Admission [when doors open, dinners go in first]
2.) Seating in our reserved balcony section
3.) A 3-course, fixed price meal (start with salad, choose your entree, choose your dessert)
Dinners should arrive no later than 90 minutes after the Door time for the show.
Jun 10, 2018 $41.95 $8.71

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Event Details

Door 7 / Show 8

Try, if only for a moment, to envision a scenario in which you could still be completely *surprised* by a rock band. It’s not easy. In fact, it’s increasingly rare. 

A couple of years ago, A Place to Bury Strangers were in search of a new drummer. Lia Simone Braswell, an L.A. native, had recently moved to New York, and was playing drums in shows around Brooklyn “just to keep her chops up.” As it turned out, APTBS bassist Dion Lunadon caught one of those shows and, after seeing her play, was moved to ask her if she’d want to come to a band practice sometime.

“I told some of my friends about it before I met up with them,” Braswell says, of the rehearsal that would soon lead to her joining the band. “They told me, ‘You’re just gonna have to keep up as much as you possibly can.’”

“To be fair, she had also never seen us live,” Lunadon adds. “She didn’t necessarily know what she was getting into.” 

What she was getting into: For well over a decade now, A Place to Bury Strangers—Lunadon, founding guitarist/singer Oliver Ackermann, and, officially, Braswell—have become well known for their unwavering commitment to unpredictable, often bewildering live shows, and total, some might say dangerous volume. They don’t write setlists. They frequently write new songs mid-set. They deliberately provoke and sabotage sound people in a variety of cruel yet innovative ways. They can and will always surprise you. “When something goes wrong on-stage, a lot of bands will crumble under the pressure,” says Ackermann. “We like the idea of embracing the moment when things go wrong and turning it into the best thing about the show.” 

This April marks the release of Pinned, their fifth full-length and an album that finds them converting difficult moments into some of their most urgent work to date. It’s their first since the 2016 election, and their first since the 2014 closing of Death By Audio, the beloved Brooklyn DIY space where Ackerman lived, worked, and created with complete freedom. “After DBA closed, I moved to an apartment in Clinton Hill,” he says. “I couldn’t make too much noise, couldn’t disturb my neighbors. I would just sit there and write with a drum machine. It had to be about writing a good song and not about being super, sonically loud.” 

There are searing meditations on truth and government-led conspiracies (“Execution”), as well as haunting, harmonized responses to the tensions of our current political climate (“There’s Only One of Us”). It all opens with “Never Coming Back,” a frightening crescendo of group vocals, vertiginous guitar work, and Lunadon’s unrelenting bass. “That song is a big concept,” Ackermann says. “You make these decisions in your life…you’re contemplating whether or not this will be the end. You think of your mortality, those moments you could die and what that means. You’re thinking about that edge of the end, deciding whether or not it’s over. When you’re close to that edge, you could teeter over.” 

It’s a clear and honest statement of intent, not just for everything that follows, but for this band as a whole. “As things go on, you don’t want them to be stagnant,” Ackermann says. “Being a band for ten years, it’s hard to keep things moving forward. I see so many bands that have been around and they’re a weaker version of what they used to be. This band is anti-that. We try to push ourselves constantly, with the live shows and the recordings. We always want to get better. You’ve got to dig deep and take chances, and sometimes, I questioned that. It took really breaking through to make it work. I think we did that.”

They definitely did. 

TICKET INFORMATION 

• Great American Music Hall is an ALL AGES (6+) venue.
• No refunds or exchanges are permitted, except in the case of headliner cancellation or date change. Opening acts are subject to change.
• There is an 8 ticket limit per customer unless otherwise stated.
• NEVER buy third party tickets (Craigslist, StubHub, etc.) for over face value. Scalped tickets may not be honored.
• Once you purchase, you will receive an order confirmation email from Eventbrite on behalf of Slim’s Presents.
• IMPORTANT: If you do not see your order confirmation in your inbox, make sure to check your junk/spam folder. If you still do not see your order confirmation, click here to access the Eventbrite help center.
• If you are having any other technical ticketing-related issues with your order, click here to contact Eventbrite. For general show info, click here.

Have questions about A Place To Bury Strangers @ GAMH w/ Sextile, Prettiest Eyes? Contact Great American Music Hall

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When & Where


Great American Music Hall
859 O'Farrell Street
San Francisco, CA 94109

Sunday, June 10, 2018 at 7:00 PM (PDT)


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Organizer

Great American Music Hall

Great American Music Hall is ALL AGES (6+) - unless stated otherwise.

Voted #6 in the Best Clubs in America list by Rolling Stone magazine in 2013, San Francisco’s oldest and grandest nightclub, the Great American Music Hall carries guests back to an earlier, more elegant era, with its ornate balconies, soaring marble columns and elaborate ceiling frescoes. Long-time customers and newcomers alike feel at home in the 5,000-square-foot concert hall that symbolized renewal and optimism when it opened in 1907. Today, a professional sound and lighting system, two full bars, a modern kitchen and a spacious oak dance floor help to blend contemporary quality with turn-of-the-century graciousness.

The remarkable interior design came from an unlikely duo: a French architect who designed the building in 1907, and Chris Buckley, a political mover and shaker who wanted to erect a grand structure after the devastating 1906 earthquake. The result was Blanco’s, characterized as one of the most popular entertainment spots during San Francisco’s notorious Barbary Coast Era. The restaurant/bordello offered fine food, gambling and fast women right up until the dark days of the Great Depression in 1933.

Three years later, in 1936, the extravagant and elaborate fan dances of local favorite, Sally Rand, brought new life to the dark building. She called it the Music Box, and swanky city dwellers would dance the night away there for the next decade.

With the end of World War II, the Music Box turned out its lights. Blanco’s reopened in 1948 as a jazz club. In the 1950s, the premises were taken over by members of the Moose Lodge. The building went into an ignominious decline that hit bottom when the building was condemned by city building inspectors. A last-minute reprieve saved it from demolition, and the tarnished interior was revamped as a short-lived French restaurant named Charles (after the proprietor, Robert Charles). It was not until 1972, when the Great American Music Hall opened, that happy music lovers filled the hall once more.

Since then the Great American Music Hall has hosted artists ranging from Duke Ellington, Sarah Vaughan and Count Basie to Van Morrison, the Grateful Dead, Arcade Fire, Patti Smith and Godspeed You! Black Emperor.


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A Place To Bury Strangers @ GAMH w/ Sextile, Prettiest Eyes
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