50th Commemoration of the Landmark In Re Gault Decision
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50th Commemoration of the Landmark In Re Gault Decision

50th Commemoration of the Landmark In Re Gault Decision

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McCoy Auditorium at the Barbara Jordan Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs

3401 Cleburne Street

Houston, TX 77004

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On March 2, 2017 from 10am-4:15pm, please join the Earl Carl Institute at Thurgood Marshall School of Law and the Juvenile Crime Prevention Center at Prairie View University for the commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of In Re Gault which set a precedent for juvenile justice.

Earn 6.0 hours/2.75 hours of CLE credit. Program topics:

  • A Historical Perspective of Juvenile Justice: Significance of In Re Gault & Its Progeny

  • Best Practices in Certification Hearings

  • Ethics in Juvenile Proceedings

  • Why Treat Children Differently: The Appropriate Age of Juvenile Jurisdiction, The Adolescent Brain, and The Philosophy of Juvenile Court vs. Adult Court

  • Where Do We Go From Here? Issues for the Future: Changes in Sentencing & PREA, Trauma Informed Representation, & Restorative Justice

Cost: $100.00 attorneys; $50.00 government and non-profit attorneys; $25.00 attendees requiring CEU credits; complimentary for students and other non-attorneys.

The event will be held in the McCoy Auditorium at the Barbara Jordan Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs on the campus of Texas Southern University from 10:00am-4:15pm. Lunch will be provided.



In re Gault, 387 U.S. 1 (1967), is a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision that held that juveniles accused of crimes in a delinquency proceeding must be afforded many of the same due process rights as adults including the right to counsel . The ruling also provided other due process rights, including the right to adequate notice of charges, the right to confront an accuser, and the right against self-incrimination.

On June 8, 1964, Gerald Francis Gault, fifteen years old, was taken into custody on suspicion of making a lewd phone call to his neighbor, Mrs. Ora Cook. After proceedings in juvenile court, Gault was committed to the State Industrial School until he reached the age of 21. Had he been an adult, his maximum punishment would have been a $50 fine or two months in jail. Instead, he faced the prospect of 6 years of incarceration. His sentence was based on the concept of parens patriae; the right of the state, as parens patriae, to deny to the child procedural rights available to his elders. The United States Supreme Court, in a decision 8-1, ruled “that Gault’s commitment to the State Industrial School was a clear violation of the 14th Amendment.”


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McCoy Auditorium at the Barbara Jordan Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs

3401 Cleburne Street

Houston, TX 77004

View Map

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