$40 – $75

4th Annual Cold Mountain Music Festival at Lake Logan

Presented by The Episcopal Diocese of WNC and Worthwhile Sounds
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Cold Mountain Music Festival at Lake Logan

25 Wormy Chestnut Lane

Canton, NC 28716

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The 4th Annual Cold Mountain Music Festival takes place in Canton NC on June 5th and 6th.

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COLD MOUNTAIN MUSIC FESTIVAL

Cold Mountain Music Festival features top-notch musical talent, amazing local food & drink vendors, family friendly activities, and more all in one of the most pristine settings imaginable. The centerpiece of the almost 300-acre property is a mile-long lake surrounded by the Shining Rock Wilderness Area of Pisgah National Forest. Funds raised from Cold Mountain Music Festival support the ministries of Lake Logan Conference Center and Camp Henry in the Episcopal Diocese of Western North Carolina.

Lake Logan has extremely limited cell service, and no public wi-fi available for festival attendees. Immerse yourself in a long overdue UNPLUGGED weekend, but please plan accordingly.

COVID-19 Statement

SAM BUSH BAND

There was only one prize-winning teenager carrying stones big enough to say thanks, but no thanks to Roy Acuff. Only one son of Kentucky finding a light of inspiration from Bill Monroe and his Blue Grass Boys and catching a fire from Bob Marley and The Wailers. Only one progressive hippie allying with like-minded conspirators, rolling out the New Grass revolution, and then leaving the genre's torch-bearing band behind as it reached its commercial peak.

There is only one consensus pick of peers and predecessors, of the traditionalists, the rebels, and the next gen devotees. Music's ultimate inside outsider. Or is it outside insider? There is only one Sam Bush.

On a Bowling Green, Kentucky cattle farm in the post-war 1950s, Bush grew up an only son, and with four sisters. His love of music came immediately, encouraged by his parents' record collection and, particularly, by his father Charlie, a fiddler, who organized local jams. Charlie envisioned his son someday a staff fiddler at the Grand Ole Opry, but a clear day's signal from Nashville brought to Bush's television screen a tow-headed boy named Ricky Skaggs playing mandolin with Flatt and Scruggs, and an epiphany for Bush. At 11, he purchased his first mandolin.

As a teen fiddler Bush was a three-time national champion in the junior division of the National Oldtime Fiddler's Contest. He recorded an instrumental album, Poor Richard's Almanac as a high school senior and in the spring of 1970 attended the Fiddlers Convention in Union Grove, NC. There he heard the New Deal String Band, taking notice of their rock-inspired brand of progressive bluegrass.

Acuff offered him a spot in his band. Bush politely turned down the country titan. It was not the music he wanted to play. He admired the grace of Flatt & Scruggs, loved Bill Monroe- even saw him perform at the Ryman- but he'd discovered electrified alternatives to tradition in the Osborne Brothers and manifest destiny in The Dillards.

See the photo of a fresh-faced Sam Bush in his shiny blue high school graduation gown, circa 1970. Tufts of blonde hair breaking free of the borders of his squared cap, Bush is smiling, flanked by his proud parents. The next day he was gone, bound for Los Angeles. He got as far as his nerve would take him- Las Vegas- then doubled back to Bowling Green.

"I started working at the Holiday Inn as a busboy," Bush recalls. "Ebo Walker and Lonnie Peerce came in one night asking if I wanted to come to Louisville and play five nights a week with the Bluegrass Alliance. That was a big, ol' 'Hell yes, let's go.'"

Bush played guitar in the group, then began playing after recruiting guitarist Tony Rice to the fold. Following a fallout with Peerce in 1971, Bush and his Alliance mates- Walker, Courtney Johnson, and Curtis Burch- formed the New Grass Revival, issuing the band's debut, New Grass Revival. Walker left soon after, replaced temporarily by Butch Robins, with the quartet solidifying around the arrival of bassist John Cowan.

"There were already people that had deviated from Bill Monroe's style of bluegrass," Bush explains. "If anything, we were reviving a newgrass style that had already been started. Our kind of music tended to come from the idea of long jams and rock-&-roll songs."

Shunned by some traditionalists, New Grass Revival played bluegrass fests slotted in late-night sets for the "long-hairs and hippies." Quickly becoming a favorite of rock audiences, they garnered the attention of Leon Russell, one of the era's most popular artists. Russell hired New Grass as his supporting act on a massive tour in 1973 that put the band nightly in front of tens of thousands.

At tour's end, it was back to headlining six nights a week at an Indiana pizza joint. But, they were resilient, grinding it out on the road. And in 1975 the Revival first played Telluride, Colorado, forming a connection with the region and its fans that has prospered for 45 years.

Bush was the newgrass commando, incorporating a variety of genres into the repertoire. He discovered a sibling similarity with the reggae rhythms of Marley and The Wailers, and, accordingly, developed an ear-turning original style of mandolin playing. The group issued five albums in their first seven years, and in 1979 became Russell's backing band. By 1981, Johnson and Burch left the group, replaced by banjoist Bela Fleck and guitarist Pat Flynn.

A three-record contract with Capitol Records and a conscious turn to the country market took the Revival to new commercial heights. Bush survived a life-threatening bout with cancer, and returned to the group that'd become more popular than ever. They released chart-climbing singles, made videos, earned Grammy nominations, and, at their zenith, called it quits.

"We were on the verge of getting bigger," recalls Bush. "Or maybe we'd gone as far as we could. I'd spent 18 years in a four-piece partnership. I needed a break. But, I appreciated the 18 years we had."

Bush worked the next five years with Emmylou Harris' Nash Ramblers, then a stint with Lyle Lovett. He took home three-straight IBMA Mandolin Player of the Year awards, 1990-92, (and a fourth in 2007). In 1995 he reunited with Fleck, now a burgeoning superstar, and toured with the Flecktones, reigniting his penchant for improvisation. Then, finally, after a quarter-century of making music with New Grass Revival and collaborating with other bands, Sam Bush went solo.

He's released seven albums and a live DVD over the past two decades. In 2009, the Americana Music Association awarded Bush the Lifetime Achievement Award for Instrumentalist. Punch Brothers, Steep Canyon Rangers, and Greensky Bluegrass are just a few present-day bluegrass vanguards among so many musicians he's influenced. His performances are annual highlights of the festival circuit, with Bush's joyous perennial appearances at the town's famed bluegrass fest earning him the title, "King of Telluride."

"With this band I have now I am free to try anything. Looking back at the last 50 years of playing newgrass, with the elements of jazz improvisation and rock-&-roll, jamming, playing with New Grass Revival, Leon, and Emmylou; it's a culmination of all of that," says Bush. "I can unapologetically stand onstage and feel I'm representing those songs well."

CHARLEY CROCKETT

“If you ask me where I’m going, I can’t tell ya cause I don’t know. But in my mind I see the Valley, you should see the way it glows.” - “The Valley”

Charley Crockett’s been running nearly his entire life, but with the title track to his sixth album, the Texas songwriter looks back at where he came from. “The Valley” chronicles his hard upbringing on the south Texas border in San Benito and his single mom’s move to Dallas, but it also distills the essence of Crockett’s fierce and restless independence.

Recorded just a week before the songwriter went under the knife for life-saving open-heart surgery in January, the album stirs with an introspection and urgency to tell his story. It’s a story of an artist searching for his place in the world, absorbing the sounds of the country as he attempts to make sense of the struggles of America and life on the road. It’s a story of exile and promise, as Crockett now runs those same highways playing for thousands of fans.

With a pawn shop guitar that his mom bought for him when he was 17, Crockett taught himself to play. Summers in New Orleans with his uncle sparked his ear, while the Dallas blues and Valley’s Tex-Mex slipped into his bloodstream.

He lit out after high school and spent a decade living rough on the road. He worked the communes and farms in Northern California. He busked the streets of New Orleans and Memphis. He ran the subways of New York City, sleeping in abandoned warehouses and constantly in trouble with the law.

Those years were a blur of highways and train cars and cities for Crockett, but they taught him how to keep moving to survive and showed him a desperate side of the country living just below the surface. And all of it fused into his music.

When he returned to Dallas in 2014 with a self-recorded album in his hand, he found a thriving music scene emerging in Deep Ellum behind artists like Leon Bridges and the Texas Gentlemen. He hustled his LP to anyone that would listen, and people took notice.

One artist whose head was turned was blues drummer Jay Moeller, who convinced Crockett to move to Austin and introduced him to iconoclastic roots producer Billy Horton. With Horton, Crockett found a partner who understood his unique and versatile style.

“I think I found my sound with working with Billy Horton,” Crockett attests of his co-producer. “I really want to show people how soul music, classic country, and blues are all right there together. I’m thinking about the respect of the tradition, and I want to be proud of it. I made this record for that express purpose of choosing to stay in my roots and keep them up front and not let them get tossed out.”

Across six albums in the past five years, the Texan has defined his own distinct roots style. Even on his platters of deep-cut blues and country covers like Lil’ G.L.’s Honky Tonk Jubilee (2017) and Lil G.L.’s Blue Bonanza (2018), Crockett pushes a suave and soulful classic Americana that melds genres and is as restless as the artist himself.

His delivery hinges with New Orleans clip, and voice slides with slight lisp that melts around his phrasing like oil skirting the surface of a pond. His ear tunes an amalgam of East Texas blues, border Tex-Mex, classic honky tonk, and Louisiana soul, swerving effortlessly between weeping George Jones-worthy country ballads and hot smoked Lazy Lester-swaddled blues. And Crockett’s own songwriting, showcased on 2016’s In the Night and 2018 breakout Lonesome as a Shadow, cuts with an equally timeless quality.

No surprise then that Crockett has found a home base in Austin, with a deep history and appreciation for stylistic dexterity and transformational takes on traditional sounds. Like Doug Sahm’s cosmic roots blender or Gary Clark Jr’s blues shredder, or even Willie Nelson’s signature jazz country phrasing, Crockett effortlessly spins his influences into his own unique mix, let loose live with shimmying stage charisma worthy of Elvis or Jerry Lee Lewis.

Another artist who took notice of the sharp new songwriter was Turnpike Troubadours frontman Evan Felker, who instantly became a champion of his music after meeting outside a show at the historic Gruene Hall. Crockett became a frequent tourmate with the band, and penned The Valley’s opening track, “Borrowed Time,” with Felker while traveling from L.A. to Colorado.

“Writing with Evan was the easiest thing,” offers Crockett. “I’ve learned everything from Evan, and I feel very blessed to know him the way I do, because he’s just special. I became a headliner through opening for them. They showed me how to do it and still stay the kind of independent cat I am.”

That independence remains essential to Crockett. Although courted by major labels and big name producers, Crockett is determined to continue forging his own path. Along the way, he’s begun to garner critical praise from national outlets like Rolling Stone, Billboard, and NPR, and made his mark at major festivals ranging from Stagecoach and Pickathon to ACL and Newport Folk. This winter, Blue Bonanza hit #10 on Billboard Blues Chart and the Americana radio album chart.

At 35, Crockett still spends most of his time on the road, and he’s hardly slowing down. Even with his surgery, Crockett was back onstage within a couple months hot-stepping across SXSW. This summer, he makes his debut at the Grand Ole Opry as he sets out for headlining US and European tours. Crockett keeps constantly moving forward, even as The Valley takes a moment to reflect on his past.

“Being from the Valley, and traveling around the country and the world, and then playing Deep Ellum hard and being in Austin the past few years - it can be hard to know where you’re really from,” he says. “My story’s wilder than people can make stories up. These songs that I’ve written on this record, it’s all really autobiographical, and they’re about as much depth as I’ve been able to capture writing about myself.”

Or as Crockett sings atop a rumbling shuffle on “The Way I’m Livin’ (Santa Rosa)”:

“If the way I’m living seem like just a mess, believe me I would choose this life over the rest.”

BLITZEN TRAPPER

“A sprawling, sumptuous testament to Weird America” —NPR

“Missing Tom Petty? He lives on in Blitzen Trapper‘s Wild and Reckless, an accomplished slice of classic rock that unabashedly sounds like Mr. Petty singing a Springsteen song with the Heartbreakers’ California guitars and a harmonica intro from Neil Young.” — The New York Times

It was on September 23, 2008 that Blitzen Trapper, after putting out three albums on its own label, released its fourth full-length album, Furr, via Sub Pop. At that time, it was a record that captured exactly where the band’s frontman, Eric Earley, found himself, both literally and metaphorically, geographically and existentially. Not that the Portland-based musician actually remembers much about the creation of the record’s 13 intriguing, spellbinding songs. Or, more specifically, what its songs actually mean, either now or then. Instead, Furr, stands as a kind of tribute and elegy to the city that inspired it, but that, a decade later, no longer exists.

“What I was trying to do with those recordings,” explains Earley, “was capture this kind of atmosphere that I was feeling and which pervaded the city at that time. I think I was attempting to capture what Portland was at the time and what it felt like to me. That city is gone now. Old Portland, we call it, but Old Portland has disappeared. But this record gives me the feeling of those times and this city— when it was poor and dumpy and really drug-addled. And it also captures the magic of the outlying rural areas that has slowly changed as well.”

That magic can be heard in each of these songs, and while the city may have vanished from sight – replaced by a newer, richer, shinier and bigger version of itself – its elegance and fractured beauty is preserved within the bones of this record. These songs exist as vivid snapshots of that time, ones that recall the city as it was. At the same time – and while Earley insists he was only trying to capture what Portland was at the time – there’s a mythology within the lyrics and the music, an imagined, semi-fictional vision of Portland and the Pacific Northwest, a kind of parallel universe to the one that actually exists.

“Back then, the city was this really weird place,” says Earley. “It was really bizarre. Weird stuff would happen. And it was much poorer and much smaller. It wasn’t as structured and rich as it is now. It was a totally different place. That’s why it’s funny when people talk about Portland – I’m like well, if you didn’t live here back then you’ll never experience what that was like but if you listen to this record you’ll get a little taste of it. So in that sense, it feels very real and non-mythical to me.”

That said, that doesn’t mean these songs are all based in reality. There are glimpses of God – and of American Christianity – throughout them, not least in the mournful folk narrative of “Black River Killer” and “God & Suicide.” The former is a made-up tale about an anonymous murderer on a killing spree which Earley cites as being about “the mindless violence that Americans consume every single day – in film and books and everything – and what does it mean for us to consume that content and make it a part of us?” The latter is a shimmering, more upbeat track that’s an attempt to commit to tape an ineffable feeling that Earley felt within him but which, after all these years, he’s still unable to pinpoint exactly.

“I can’t tell you what that song’s about,” he says. “I know what it feels like, but I don’t know what it actually literally means. But the words and the music gave me this feeling as I was writing it that made sense at the time. I feel like there’s a feeling of longing that accompanies this record somehow, and there’s this weird longing to be set free. I feel that’s what kind of pervades this record – a melancholic longing for something that we can’t obtain. In “God & Suicide” it’s almost like—and it’s me obviously—but it’s almost like whoever is saying those words is saying to himself ‘Well I’ve got two choices. Either I kill myself or I somehow make my peace with whatever God is.”

Not all the songs have such existential explanations. The soft acoustic jangle of the title track is full of wistful longing, while the plaintive, poignant piano of “Not Your Lover” is a forlorn love – or loss of love – song full of tender sadness. That’s one of a few songs that wouldn’t actually exist had the band—completed at the time by Brian Adrian Koch (drums, vocals), Michael Van Pelt (bass), Erik Menteer (guitar, Moog), Drew Laughery (keyboards) and Marty Marquis (guitar, vocals, melodica)—not found an old warped piano in the hallway of Sally Mack’s School Of Dance, the Portland building which housed the band’s studio. Needless to say, the discovery definitely helped shape the direction of the record.

“That song,” says Earley, “wouldn’t exist, I don’t think, without that piano. I remember sitting at that thing when I first pulled it in and tinkering with it and just sort of writing that one right away. So it probably would have been a slightly different record. A lot of the songs I wrote on piano and I wouldn’t have because I didn’t have one.”

That’s also partly because Earley admits he wasn’t trying to write an album at that time but write songs to perfect the recording technique he’d been honing when making the band’s previous full-length, 2007’s Wild Mountain Nation. As such, around three albums’ worth of material was recorded during the sessions for Furr, and it’s a selection of those that comprise the bonus material for this anniversary edition of the record. From the dulcet, chugging tones of “War Is Placebo” to the carefree, summer whimsy of “Ballad Of Bird Love”—a song driven by that same piano—and the melancholy folk tale waltz of “On My Way To The Bay”, the ten outtakes included here offer even further insight into Earley’s creative mindset and the feeling—whatever it is, exactly—that sits at the center of these songs. Written largely between the hours of 11pm and the morning—something that was possible because, in between tours, Earley was living in the studio building—Furr is a very nocturnal album, full of the wonder and the mystery of the night.

Perhaps surprisingly, given the fact Earley wasn’t trying to make a record per se, Furr is an impressively cohesive album, and its counterpart bonus tracks are as well. Much of that is down to Earley’s fastidious recording techniques, using old analogue equipment to create a sound that was inherently nostalgic but also, at the time, anyway, entirely unusual.

“At the time,” he says, “I was going for a very specific sound. And it’s funny, because it’s a sound that you hear so much nowadays—bands have this recording aesthetic that’s very, very lo-fi and almost exactly what I was doing back then, but I was doing it with machinery that was meant to do that as opposed tobands now, who are doing it with modern digital plug-ins. At the time, I was just making what I’d like to hear and I didn’t know if anyone else will like it. It sounds old and distorted—the sound I’d hear in my head when riding my bike around town at 2 in the morning.”

Those days (and nights) may have faded into the past, but they’re very much present within the fabric of Furr. A decade on, they sound just as magical and mystical.

Not, of course, that the band is just relying on the past glory of this record. Far from it. A decade on from the release of Furr, has released five more critically acclaimed and achingly beautiful records. The band hasn’t loosened its ambitions, either. In 2017, the band put together Wild And Reckless a full-production theater event that ran for a month at Portland’s Center Stage theater and which also spawned last year’s full-length of the same name. There are plenty of plans for the future in the works, too. But for now, just for a little while, it’s time to revel in the joy and sorrow of a time and place that no longer exists—except of course, in a few hearts and minds, and in these wonderfully wistful songs.

AMYTHYST KIAH

“BLACK MYSELF” GRAMMY NOMINATED FOR BEST AMERICANA ROOTS SONG

FOLK ALLIANCE INTERNATIONAL’S SONG OF THE YEAR WINNER 2020

“Her razor-sharp guitar picking alone guarantees her a place among masters, but it’s her deep-hued voice that can change on a dime from brushed steel to melted toffee that commands attention.” — The New York Times

“Amythyst Kiah is one of roots music’s most exciting emerging talents, blending a deep knowledge of old time music with sensibilities spanning classic country to contemporary R&B.” — Rolling Stone

Born in Chattanooga and based in Johnson City, Amythyst Kiah’s commanding stage presence is matched by her raw and powerful vocals—a deeply moving, hypnotic sound that stirs echoes of a distant and restless past.

Accompanied interchangeably with banjo, acoustic guitar, or a full band, her eclectic influences span decades, finding inspiration in old time music, alternative rock, folk, country, and blues.

Our Native Daughters, her recent collaboration with Rhiannon Giddens, Leyla McCalla, and Allison Russell (Birds of Chicago), has delivered a full-length album produced by Rhiannon Giddens and Dirk Powell, Songs of Our Native Daughters (out now on Smithsonian Folkways). NPR described the opening track, Black Myself, written by Amythyst, as “the simmering defiance of self-respect in the face of racism.” The song was nominated for a Grammy for Best American Roots Song. The supergroup hit the road in July 2019 with a series of special dates that included performances at Washington D.C.’s Smithsonian Museum of African American History & Culture as well as Newport Folk Festival. The group was nominated for Duo/Group of the Year at the 2019 Americana Honors & Awards. Black Myself won 2019 Song of the Year at the Folk Alliance International Conference.

Provocative and fierce, Amythyst’s ability to cross boundaries is groundbreaking and simply unforgettable. Her stylistic range will be on full display in her next full-length album expected in 2020. Amythyst regularly tours the United Kingdom and has performed at Celtic Connections, Southern Fried Festival, Cambridge Folk Festival, the Edinburgh Jazz & Blues Festival, and SummerTyne Americana Festival. She is a crowd favorite at Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion in the U.S. and has shined at the John F. Kennedy Center for Performing Arts, Smithsonian Folk Life Festival, Winnipeg Folk Festival, and opening for artists such as the Indigo Girls, Rhiannon Giddens, Dom Flemons, Old Crow Medicine Show, First Aid Kit, Darrell Scott, and Tim O’Brien.

FUTUREBIRDS

Recently celebrating their 10th anniversary as a band, Futurebirds have been receiving rave reviews for their unparalleled live performances and their most recent LP "Teamwork." Follow them to see why Rolling Stone calls Futurebirds "one of the most fascinating and captivating rock acts touring today" on and off the stage.

SIERRA FERRELL

Wicked and wild, her sirens call an oil spill, floating atop thee languid waves of torment, a nanny-nanny-bew-bew to the ocean beneath, she caresses thee buoying masses, holding them aloft with thee effortless grace of a branch-bearing dove. Born from the dark, rich soil of West Virginia, raised in the clear, hop-scented country air, Sierra Ferrell cut her teeth on the rail lines, truck stops, street corners, and dingy, dimly lit listening rooms all across the land, belting out her old-time melodies, a sorcery, drawing her patrons, ever more deeply, into her animated tapestry of forlorn, star-crossed love, of longing, poverty, of suffering and triumph, encompassing that irreconcilable thrum of the human spirit and all the complexities of emotion that come with it.

One moment, with startling clarity, she calls to bear the opium opulence, that seductively solemn soujorn of the 1920s jazz club stage, the next, she'll have you taking to your toes, dancing in careless merriment, whirling, winking, and carrying on with all the confidence of a honky tonk king or queen, while she plays, sings, stomps, and yodels out the utter essence of the honky tonk country blues. You turn to your partner, peer into their eyes with the recognition of a perfect moment, and plant a kiss firmly upon their lips. They smile as your lips meet, pull you in tighter, romance... is born anew! Catch her now, folx, in this most intimate of settings, for her Star is ever on the rise!

AMANDA ANNE PLATT & THE HONEYCUTTERS

Amanda Anne Platt & The Honeycutters are on tour supporting the release of their new album, Live at the Grey Eagle, recorded in front of a hometown crowd in Asheville, North Carolina. “I’ve wanted to do a live album for a long time. I think that when a band has been touring together, and everyone is really in step with one another, the songs take on an entirely different spirit live. Some of the older songs have grown and changed with me over the years, and I wanted to capture that, too. Live versions simply have more of a pulse to them than studio recordings,” says Platt.

There is an empathetic and charming wit ingrained in Amanda’s songwriting. She has a knack for accessing a deep well of emotion and applying it to her storytelling, whether she is writing from her own experiences or immersing herself into the melody of emotions in another person’s life. Performing along with Platt, The Honeycutters are Matt Smith (pedal steel and electric guitars), Rick Cooper (bass/vocals), and Evan Martin (drums/vocals).

What folks are saying

“Amanda is so good it’s ridiculous. I don’t even know what words to use. Her singing, songwriting and presence is unmatched in Americana, Country, Pop… Simply breathtaking,” said Saul Davis: producer (Percy Sledge), manager (Gene Clark, Carla Olson, Phil Seymour).

“Amanda Platt writes songs on par with Lucinda, Isbell, Lauderdale, Hank Sr. In my opinion, anyway.” said, WNCW’s Music Director Martin Anderson to No Depression.

“Platt’s voice is fair magical. Clearly annunciated, every word is infused with poetic loveliness, made all the more appealing for the slight twang that causes syllables to rise and fall at the end of lines. Like Joy Lynn White once upon a time and Zoe Muth more recently, Platt can sing of desperation and despair while retaining pride of steel… throughout On the Ropes Platt delivers personal devastation that touches universally.” Lonesome Road Review, Donald Teplyske

“The easy swagger of ‘On the Ropes,’ the saunter and sway of ‘Golden Child,’ the unassuming ramble of ‘The Handbook’ and the sweet serenade of ‘500 Pieces’ projects an effortless allure that remains consistently engaging throughout… obviously destined to become a heavyweight contender.” No Depression, Lee Zimmerman

“Forget Nashville, with their buzz-making brand of rock-roots-country, the Honeycutters are out to make Asheville, NC the brand new music city.” Elmore Magazine Song Premiere: “On The Ropes”

“Whenever you feel that country music is reinventing itself to the extreme and drifting off into dangerous waters, dig just slightly below the surface and salvation is at hand… The devil is in the detail. This is a band that relies on traditional country music instrumentation played and performed by artists who remain true to country music heritage.” Your Life in a Song (UK)

“On The Ropes wonderfully showcases Platt’s dazzling songwriting skills with themes of loss, loneliness, nostalgia and getting the shit kicked out of you by love. All thirteen tracks are original material, except for a fascinating cover of Leonard Cohen’s iconic ‘Hallelujah’, sung in a spellbinding manner and just dripping of honeysuckle and moonshine.” That Music Mag, Jane Roser

“On The Ropes, I suppose, is Americana. Occupying the space where Sturgill Simpson and Jason Isbell and Margo Price dwell, what used to be called country (but what is being called country just isn’t). There are such finely realized moments and details here…” Popshifter, Melissa Bratcher

“There are songs here like Blue Besides that could easily fit on a Kacey Musgraves album while others would not feel out of place on a Eilen Jewell release. That just shows the versatility and scope of the band, it’s music and Platt’s writing.”Lonesome Highway, Stephen Rapid

“An album that shines like a good deed in a naughty world.” 3rd Coast Music, Johnny Conquest

“Amanda Anne Platt, lead singer/songwriter for the Honeycutters, is a master songwriter, not because she finds unusual metaphors, creates cute wordplay, or buries deep psychological meaning in her lyrics, but because her songs are so effortlessly conversational. She’s like that old friend at the bar who sidles up to you real close, in your personal space, and grabs your forearm to get your attention because she really really wants to make sure you get what she’s telling you. Her songs command attention because they are so darn human you believe them.” Americana Music Show, Calvin Powers

PIERCE EDENS

Over the last ten years, Pierce Edens has been drawing on his Appalachian songwriting roots and blending them with the grungy rock and roll sounds that took him in his teenage years. The result is a haunting and fiery mixture that is notoriously hard to pin down. Allmusic.com classifies Edens as both “Folk-Rock” and “psychedelic-grunge,” and No Depression writer Bill Kopp says “[He] could just as easily- and accurately- be tagged with the singer/songwriter label; He’s a gritty troubadour who takes what he needs from each style, blending and bending it to suit the needs of his songs.” Or, as Fred Mills state in Blurt Magazine, “Somewhere up there in the hills of western North Carolina a lot of bodies are buried, and Pierce Edens is the man with the locations. There’s no evidence that a cop, D.A. or judge can bring forth, mind you, but he clearly knows something; you can hear it in his twisted, tortured vocal bray […] a soulful-yet-serrated instrument that conveys far more than even its owner might intend.”

Now, in his fifth fully independent album (Stripped Down Gussied Up), Edens has taken his singular voice back home to his studio in Western North Carolina to bury some more bodies. This album witnesses Edens stripping down the instrumentation to simply the vocals, percussion, and guitar, alongside his long time band-mate Kevin Reese accompanying with lead guitar, mandolin, and occasional banjo for a handful of genre-bending songs. Stripped Down Gussied Up delivers Edens’ signature sound as it should be heard; intimate and atmospheric, glittery, gritty, and raw.

JOE LASHER

Born and raised in Weaverville, NC, country music entertainer and songwriter Joe Lasher has been calling the stage home since he was a teenager. Following in the footsteps of his grandfather, a southern gospel singer, and father, the member of a 90’s rock band, Joe has set his sights on capturing the attention of country music lovers.

Drawing inspiration from icons such as Rodney Atkin, Eric Church, Jon Bon Jovi and Bryan Adams, Joe’s music is influenced by a variety of genres ranging from traditional country to gospel and from rock to heavy metal, creating a sound that is all his own. Joe has been actively touring the country since the age of 16, where he is focused on creating a full-sensory show filled with big sound and bright lights giving his audience a reason to sing and dance.

Already, Joe has shared the stage with Brett Young, Locash, Ashley McBryde, Russell Dickerson, Hardy, and Old Dominion. His next single “Messed up” releases on January 31st in anticipation for new music coming in 2020.

Between his time on the stage and in the studio, Joe lives on and works a 300-acre farm outside of Nashville, where he hunts and fishes like every true country boy should.

NOAH PROUDFOOT & THE BOTANICALS

From TedX to festivals and venues up and down the East Coast, Noah Proudfoot is a soul-powered songwriter doing things a little differently. Using elements of funk, R&B, and roots-rock, his soulful voice stirs the human spirit and dives beneath the static of daily life. Studied in poetry and certified as a yoga teacher, his lyrics are carefully crafted to motivate and inspire. His full band, Noah Proudfoot and the Botanicals, broadcasts these messages on a much larger scale, gaining attention in the transformational music scene and attracting a following of like minded fans. Opening for bands such as Satsang and Yaima, they have become known as a group that can deliver a high-energy dance party with a purpose. Last year they released their debut EP 'Travel Light,' at the Asheville Music Hall to an enthusiastic crowd of fans. This year they delivered a brand new single, 'Wild One,' which draws on indie-rock influences and displays the bands ability to capture a multitude of sounds and styles. Catch them on the road this year as they make their way to festivals across the region, and continue their mission of uplifting audiences and inspiring a generation of change-makers.

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Cold Mountain Music Festival at Lake Logan

25 Wormy Chestnut Lane

Canton, NC 28716

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