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2017 J-mester at Morehouse College

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Morehouse College

830 Westview Drive Southwest

Atlanta, GA 30314

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The January Term, or J-Mester, will be held Jan 9 – 13, 2017. J-Mester is an exciting opportunity for Morehouse students to have a non-traditional educational experience during an intensive, one-week period before the beginning of the spring semester. J-Mester opportunities are geared toward strengthening Morehouse students' abilities to demonstrate acuity and agency in many developmental areas. J-Mester offerings will be offered in the following categories: Academic Seminars, Life Skills/Personal Development, and Career/Professional Development. Crown Forum credit will be given according to the following criteria:

  • 2 hour session = 1 crown forum attendance
  • 4 hour session (half-day) = 2 crown forum attendances
  • 7 hour session (full-day) = 3 crown forum attendances
  • Academic Seminar = 2 FULL semesters of crown forum
    • 3-hours/day, Monday-Friday


*Crown Forum requirements earned through J-Mester will be administered per semester — versus per Crown Forum session attended, and will be applied toward graduation requirements and past, failed Crown Forum Semesters. Crown forum requirements will be given for COMPLETE ATTENDANCE AND PARTICIPATION ONLY. Partial credit will not be given. A maximum of TWO crown forum semesters may be applied toward graduation requirements.*


Deadline to register is Friday, December 23rd at 12pm! Early registration is strongly recommended as spots are extremely limited. Below you will find the waitlist for Academic Seminars that are full.

2017 J-Mester Academic Seminar Waitlist - (Link will be posted once at least one session is full)



Academic Seminars (2 FULL SEMESTERS OF CROWN FORUM): Monday-Friday, 9am-noon

*YOU CAN ONLY PICK ONE SEMINAR AS THEY ARE AT THE SAME TIME*




  • Social Determinants of Health in the Community with Dr. Teanise Davis, Assistant Professor of Psychology

What determines health status? It is more than just knowing better – we can teach people what to do. It is more than just doing better – people can change their behavior. What determines health? This J-Mester course will highlight how race, economic status, education level, and the built environment impact the health of individuals and communities. We will spend five days doing service in the Kirkwood Urban Forest in Atlanta, Georgia, learning about social determinants, and partnering with the DeKalb Services Center to improve and make the Kirkwood Urban Forest more accessible for elderly adults (seniors) in the area.

  • Introduction to Disability Studies: Disability Literature, the Disability Rights Movement, and Social Justice with Dr. Sony Loftis, Associate Professor of English

This hybrid course serves as an intensive introduction to the emerging field of critical disability studies. In addition to reading essays that have been central to the development of the field as a form of literary criticism, we will also practice applying knowledge of the social and cultural models of disability to classic literary texts involving disabled characters. This course will focus on both theory (examining the intersectionality of modern identity politics and exploring questions of rhetoric, ethos, and disability disclosure) and the reality of the disability rights movement as an ongoing struggle for civil rights (engaging questions of ethics and disability discrimination). By the end of the course, students should be equipped to think critically about disability as both embodied reality and social construct and to speak and write knowledgably about issues pertaining to the disability rights movement.

  • Ethics and Animals: Violence or nonviolence? with Dr. Nathan Nobis, Associate Professor of Philosophy

Many people say that violence is wrong, and that violence is only morally justified under extreme circumstances. But what about violence towards animals? On any common definition of 'violence', animals are treated violently when they are raised and killed to be eaten, or experimented on for medical research or used for other purposes that, arguably, harm them. What, if anything, then would justify this violence? What, if anything, would morally justify common, yet often very violent, treatment and uses of animals? In this course, we will explore a range of answers to these questions, given by influential philosophers, scientists and advocates on all sides. Topics include: theories of ethics, animal minds, and ethical issues concerning the uses of animals for food, clothing, experimentation, entertainment, hunting, as companions or pets, and other purposes.

  • The Black middle Class Dilemma with Dr. Adria Welcher, Assistant Professor of Sociology

This course will explore the lived experiences of members of the black middle class in the United States at large, with a particular focus on the black middle class in Atlanta, GA. We will explore educational, criminal justice, financial, and residential experiences specifically. The course will include a walking tour of a black middle class area and one of a comparable white middle class area.

  • Authenticity 101: the Writer's Voice and the Writer's Eye through Sound-Photo-scape, Autobiography, and Learning not to See Things Right Away with Dr. Cindy Lutenbacher, Associate Professor of English

Authenticity 101 was concocted by an old woman who put on her mad scientist cap, with one hand on her creative writing quill and the other hand on a computer… In one absurdly intense week, we will create a small writing community in order to engage a no-boundaries/no-holds-barred exploration of our own infinitely valuable and worthy stories. Using published music, photos we take, and our own creative non-fiction writing, our work will culminate in individual projects that reveal those stories for the magnificence that they are.

  • Law and Resources for Minority Entrepreneurship with Dr. Vince Eagan , Associate Professor of Business

This course will provide an overview of law and business development resources for minority entrepreneurs. The course will provide a basic overview of:

  • Legal forms of business organization for start-ups (corporations, partnerships, LLCs, etc.).
  • Legal requirements for a nonprofit corporation.
  • Contract law, leases, employment and consumer protection law.
  • Government programs that promote the utilization of minority business at the federal, state and local level.
  • Intellectual property law as it relates to developing an app and/or being in the entertainment industry.
  • Business development and financing assistance, including crowd sourcing.

At the end of the course students will have produced their own incorporation documents, contracts, minority business certification, nondisclosure agreement, loan package, and if necessary, intellectual property research. They will know how to find resources to help with their entrepreneurial endeavors. The course should help pre-law students as well as students trying to understand the necessary documents for business start-ups and creation of nonprofit corporations.

  • History Matters: Exploring Civil Rights and Social Justice with Dr. Vicki Crawford, Associate Professor of African American Studies/Director, Morehouse College Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection

History Matters: Exploring Civil Rights and Social Justice will encompass a week-long experience introducing students to key leaders, events and milestones in the African-American freedom struggle. Through hands-on experience using primary documents in the Morehouse King Collection and visits to historic sites, students will be encouraged to think critically and to make connection between events of the past and the present day. The overall goal of the experience is to help students explore the historical origins of contemporary issues and to inspire them to innovate their own creative solutions to real-world problems.




DEVELOPMENTAL SESSIONS




Monday, January 9th

TBA




Tuesday, January 10th

  • Competitively Compete: The Secret to Graduate School Admissions: Planning & Coaching Session (Half-Day, 9am-1pm & 1-5pm) *This session is offered twice.

Graduate school, whether in pursuit of a Masters or Ph.D., for many students, conjures up scary
thoughts of additional time in school, increased debt, applications, standardized tests, statements of
purpose, apprehension on where to attend, etc. This HIGH-IMPACT (4hr) workshop session, conducted
by Higher Education & Learning Professional Consulting, Inc. (HELP) "College Admissions: Planning &
Coaching" will first introduce you to the entire graduate school “process”, then walk you through each
phase, connecting the dots from where you are to where you want to go. The workshop focuses on how
to:

START your graduate/professional school process
FIND the best fit program based on your career goals
POSITION yourself for acceptance and funding
WRITE impactful essays and Statements of Purpose
SCORE higher on your respective entrance exams

In essence, HELP will assist you to know “Who to talk to, what to say, how to say it and when to say it,
to position yourself for graduate school admission and funding.”
HELP’s Graduate School Prep Secrets 101 workshop will relax and support the minds of students already
looking towards graduate school and jump start the process for those who are just starting out or have
been indifferent to the possibility.

  • Leadership Education and Development - Leadership 101 with Dr. Belinda Johnson-White, Associate Professor of Business and Management Program Director (2-hour session, 10am-noon)

This session will expose student to the skills, resources, and experiential learning situations that will enable them to become effective student leaders and peer helpers. Recognizing that one cannot learn everything that they will need to know to be successful as a student leader by attending any combination of Informational, this certificate program is designed to further enhance your leadership knowledge and skills. Each day we will engage in topics that will not only increase a student’s personal knowledge base but also assist students in their preparedness to service the campus. Using classroom tools like discussion, group projects, role playing, readings, personal reflection, and assignments, we will explore a wide variety of topics related to human development within the college setting.




Wednesday , January 11th

  • Leadership Education and Development - Diversity in Leadership with Dr. Belinda Johnson-White, Associate Professor of Business and Management Program Director (2-hour session, 10am-noon)

This session will expose student to the skills, resources, and experiential learning situations that will enable them to become effective student leaders and peer helpers. Recognizing that one cannot learn everything that they will need to know to be successful as a student leader by attending any combination of Informational, this certificate program is designed to further enhance your leadership knowledge and skills. Each day we will engage in topics that will not only increase a student’s personal knowledge base but also assist students in their preparedness to service the campus. Using classroom tools like discussion, group projects, role playing, readings, personal reflection, and assignments, we will explore a wide variety of topics related to human development within the college setting.

The outcomes of this session are:

- To increase a student leaders’ knowledge, skills and disposition in inter- and intra-personal relations/

- Define culture and cultural dimensions of leadership.

- Describe how leadership behavior differs in various cultural clusters




Thursday, January 12th

  • Leadership Education and Development - Servant Leadership with Dr. Belinda Johnson-White, Associate Professor of Business and Management Program Director (2-hour session, 10am-noon)

This session will expose student to the skills, resources, and experiential learning situations that will enable them to become effective student leaders and peer helpers. Recognizing that one cannot learn everything that they will need to know to be successful as a student leader by attending any combination of Informational, this certificate program is designed to further enhance your leadership knowledge and skills. Each day we will engage in topics that will not only increase a student’s personal knowledge base but also assist students in their preparedness to service the campus. Using classroom tools like discussion, group projects, role playing, readings, personal reflection, and assignments, we will explore a wide variety of topics related to human development within the college setting.

The outcomes of this session are:

- Explain how servant leadership works

- Discuss the strengths and criticisms of servant leadership

- Recognize applications of servant leadership





Friday, January 13th

  • BeYond Morehouse - How to Gain Admission Into the Law School, Internship, or Job of your Choice! with Winfield W. Murray, Adjunct Professor, Constitutional Law (Half-day session, 1-5pm)


Are you concerned about getting into the Law school of your choice or whether you will be selected for your dream internship/job? Then this is the course for you. We will examine how you can put your best forward and exponentially increase your probability of being selected. The course will discuss how to effectively craft resumes, cover letters, personal statements and thank you letters. We will review good examples and bad examples of each.

Moreover, we will discuss when a resume can and should extend beyond one page in length, how to properly eradicate white space from a resume, underused action verbs, overused action verbs, the use of more than one bullet point, and present tense vs. past tense action verbs. Then the course will examine personal statements/cover letters, namely, how to construct an effective paragraph, the importance of using both simple sentences and complex sentences, why contractions should never be used in a professional paper, the importance of transition words, and the overuse of conjunctions. Then will discuss interviews. Specifically, how do you prepare for an interview, what tools are at your disposal to conduct research, preparing for the ten (10) most commonly asked interview questions, drafting intelligent questions to ask your interviewer, how to dress for the interview, displaying positive body language, avoiding negative body language, and the importance of presenting confidence in an interview. The course will conclude by conducting mock interviews and discussing how to use social media/apps to your advantage.


*Please note that this is the most current list. Other seminars will be added throughout December.*

If you have any questions, please contact Dean Darren Jones at darren.jones@morehouse.edu


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830 Westview Drive Southwest

Atlanta, GA 30314

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