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16th Annual Fair Housing Symposium

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University of the District of Columbia

4200 Connecticut Avenue Northwest

Student Center, Grand Ballroom

Washington, DC 20008

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Celebrate Fair Housing Month in DC!

Please join us at our 16th Annual DC Fair Housing Symposium, as we explore this year’s theme “Transformative Integration: Changing Times in Fair Housing.” This year, we are honored to host keynote Professor Sheryll Cashin, who has worked in the White House as an adviser on urban and economic policy, particularly concerning community development in inner-city neighborhoods. Her book Place Not Race was nominated for an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Non-Fiction in 2015.

At the Symposium, Professor Cashin will discuss the toll segregation is taking on the social fabric and democracy. She will also present a vision for how we might transcend the political gridlock that segregation facilitates, particularly how we might build strong multiracial coalitions for housing integration.

Monday, April 24, 2017
Grand Ballroom at the UDC Student Center
(right next to the Van Ness Metro)
4200 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC 20008
Doors open at 3pm

Download the event flyer here

A light reception will be provided following Professor Cashin's remarks and Q&A session. Starting at 6pm, grab a seat at one of the following free workshops for tenants, landlords, developers, and advocates:


  • Immigrants are Welcome Here: Know Your Housing Rights in DC (6-7pm): In DC, it is illegal for landlords to treat you differently or refuse to rent to you because of what country you or your parents are from. This workshop will be co-presented by the Equal Rights Center and the DC Office of Human Rights. Workshop participants will leave with information about their legal rights and responsibilities, examples of common cases of national origin discrimination in the District, and awareness about how to respond and who can help if they do encounter housing discrimination. If you have questions about apartment seekers who don’t have a Social Security number or speak English or apartment seekers who have recently arrived in the US, this workshop is for you!
  • Assessment of Fair Housing: A Tool to Promote More Equitable Communities (6-7pm): For more than forty years, HUD funding recipients have been obligated by law to reduce barriers to fair housing by affirmatively furthering the Act’s goals of promoting fair housing and equal opportunity. In 2015, HUD published final regulations that include detailed information about what funding recipients must do to comply with the requirement and the various stakeholders that should be involved with producing an Assessment of Fair Housing. Jarrod Elwell of Enterprise Community Partners, Inc. will lead the discussion about what’s required and how to participate.
  • Know Your Rights: Housing Discrimination Based on How You Pay Your Rent is Illegal! (7-8pm): In DC, it is illegal for landlords to treat you differently or refuse to rent to you because of your lawful source of income, such as a housing voucher or other rental assistance. This workshop will be co-presented by the Equal Rights Center and the DC Office of Human Rights. Workshop participants will leave with information about their legal rights and responsibilities, examples of common source of income violations in the District, and awareness about how to respond and who can help if they do encounter housing discrimination.

  • Barriers to Rental Housing (7-8pm): Housing discrimination remains a major obstacle in accessing housing, limiting choice and raising the costs associated with securing housing, particularly for low- and moderate-income households and members of underserved groups. The prevalence of discrimination, low vacancy rates, as well as continued rising area housing costs has compounded the problems faced by housing consumers in DC. This workshop dives into these issues and will help you to navigate the housing search process and overcome barriers. Learn about the District of Columbia's housing and financial assistance programs, housing search tools, how credit impacts housing options and how to identify and report housing discrimination. This workshop will be lead by Housing Counseling Services, Inc.


About Sheryll Cashin

Sheryll Cashin, Professor of Law at Georgetown University, teaches Constitutional Law, and Race and American Law among other subjects. She writes about race relations and inequality in America. Her new book, Loving, will release in June 2017 in conjunction with the 50th Anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court decision in Loving v. Virginia, which struck down bans on interracial marriage. In it she explores the history and future of interracial intimacy and its potential impact on American culture and politics. Her book, Place Not Race (Beacon, 2014) was nominated for an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Non-Fiction in 2015. Her book, The Failures of Integration (PublicAffairs, 2004) was an Editors’ Choice in the New York Times Book Review. Cashin is also a two-time nominee for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award for non-fiction (2005 and 2009). She has published widely in academic journals and written commentaries for the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Salon, The Root, and other media.

Professor Cashin is Vice Chair of the board of the National Portrait Gallery, and an active member of the Poverty and Race Research Action Council. She worked in the Clinton White House as an advisor on urban and economic policy, particularly concerning community development in inner-city neighborhoods. She was law clerk to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and Judge Abner Mikva of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. She graduated summa cum laude from Vanderbilt University with a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering. As a Marshall Scholar, she went on to receive a masters in English Law with honors from Oxford University and a J.D. with honors from Harvard Law School where she was a member of the Harvard Law Review. Cashin was born and raised in Huntsville, Alabama, where her parents were political activists. She currently resides in Washington, DC, with her husband and two sons.

About the Fair Housing Symposium

This annual event is hosted by the DC Office of Human Rights, DC Department of Housing and Community Development, DC Developmental Disabilities Council, Equal Rights Center, and 2017 nonprofit partner Housing Counseling Services, Inc.

To request a reasonable accommodation or language interpretation, please contact Teresa.Rainey@dc.gov or 202-727-5343 by April 14th.

Date and Time

Location

University of the District of Columbia

4200 Connecticut Avenue Northwest

Student Center, Grand Ballroom

Washington, DC 20008

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