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Basic types

Integer

10

A standard JSON integer.

Boolean

true

A standard JSON boolean.

String

"Ihre Aal ist r\u00fcckw\u00e4rts"

A standard JSON string.

(When POSTing data as application/x-www-form-urlencoded, use a UTF-8 encoded string instead rather than unicode escapes)

Date

"2010-01-31"

A date represented as a string in ISO8601 date format.

Datetime

"2010-01-31T13:00:00Z"

A datetime represented as a string in ISO8601 combined date and time format, always in UTC.

Local Datetime

"2010-01-31T13:00:00"

A datetime represented as a string in Naive Local ISO8601 date and time format, in the timezone of the event.

Datetime with Timezone

{
    "timezone": "America/Los_Angeles",
    "utc": "2018-05-12T02:00:00Z",
    "local": "2018-05-11T19:00:00"
}

A combination of a timezone from the Olson specification as a string, and two datetime values, one for the UTC time represented and one for the local time in the named timezone.

When being sent as input, only utc and timezone are required; local is ignored.

This value is only used for fields where the timezone itself is important information - for example, event start times.

List

[1, 2, 3, 4]

"1,2,3,4"

A list of literal values. With a content-type of application/json, it should be a JSON array of literals, otherwise, for application/x-www-form-urlencoded it should be a string than is a comma separated list of values.

Object List

[{"name1": "val1", "name2": "val2"}, {...}]

"[{\"name1\": \"val1\", \"name2\": \"val2\"}, {...}]"

A JSON list of object values. With a content-type of application/json, it should be a JSON array, otherwise, for application/x-www-form-urlencoded it should be a string encoding of a JSON array.

Dictionary

{"key1": "value1", "key2": {"objectkey": "value"}, "key3": [list_values], {...}}

"{\"key2\": {\"key3\": \"value\"}, \"key1\": \"value\", \"key4\": [\"value\", \"value\"]}"

A JSON object representation of a dictionary. With a content-type of application/json, it should be a JSON object, otherwise, for application/x-www-form-urlencoded it should be a string encoding of a JSON object.

Multipart Text

{
    "text": "Event Name",
    "html": "<b>Event</b> Name",
}

Returned for fields which represent HTML, like event names and descriptions.

The html key represents the original HTML (which _should_ be sanitized and free from injected script tags etc., but as always, be careful what you put in your DOM), while the text key is a stripped version useful for places where you can’t or don’t need to display the full HTML version.

Currency

{
    "currency": "USD",
    "value": 432,
    "display": "$4.32"
}

When submitting as form-encoded POST data, you can instead provide a string indicating the currency and the value separated by a comma, e.g. USD,432 - however, when you submit a JSON POST body, you must submit this as a JSON object with the currency and value fields.

Returned for monetary values, such as ticket prices, fees charged and tax amounts.

Currencies are represented as their currency code and an integer value, where the code is the currency code as defined by ISO 4217 and the integer value is the number of units of the minor unit of the currency (e.g. cents for US dollars).

You can get a value in the currency’s major unit - for example, dollars or pound sterling - by taking the integer value provided and shifting the decimal point left by the exponent value for that currency as defined in ISO 4217.

For example, the exponent for USD (the US dollar) is 2, so a value of 2311 becomes $23.11. For JPY (the Japanese yen) it’s 0, so a value of 2311 becomes ¥2311.

Eventbrite does not currently sell tickets in non-decimal currencies, such as the Malagasy ariary (MGA), but any value for them would also be returned in minor units (for example, ("MGA", 7) would mean 1.2 MGA, or 1 ariary and 2 francs).

The display value is provided for your convenience; its formatting may change depending on the locale you query the API with (for example, commas for decimal separators in European locales).

Address

{
    "address_1": "Apartment 106",
    "address_2": "45 Royal Street",
    "city": "London",
    "region": "London",
    "postal_code": "SW1A 1AA",
    "country": "GB"
}

Though address formatting varies considerably between different countries and regions, Eventbrite still has a common address return format to keep things consistent.

In general, you should treat address_1, address_2, city, and region as opaque lines of the address printed in that order. The postal_code field contains the local postal or zip code equivalent, if available, and the country field contains the ISO 3166 country code for the country (with the name of the country broken out for your convenience).

All fields apart from address_1 and country are optional.

Object

{
    "resource_uri": "https://www.eventbriteapi.com/v3/events/3564383166/",
    "id": "3564383166",
}

The standard base representation for first-class objects in Eventbrite, such as event, venue and order.

The resource_uri is an absolute URL to the API endpoint that will return you the canonical representation of the event, and the id is a string that represents a unique identifer for the event (note that it is not necessarily numeric).

Other fields on objects are defined on their individual pages, but note that fields may not be present if their value is null; we have noted fields that may not contain a value with (optional).