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Walsh University Division of Physical Therapy and the East Central District of the OPTA Present the Inaugural Spring Conference for Clinical Excellence

Friday, March 15, 2013 at 8:00 AM - Saturday, March 16, 2013 at 5:00 PM (EDT)

Walsh University Division of Physical Therapy and the E...

Registration Information

Registration Type Sales End Price Fee Quantity
Differential Diagnosis of Sinister Pathologies: Which Tests are Best? Friday, March 15, 8:00 AM-12:00 PM   more info Ended $75.00 $5.12
Optimizing Functional Recovery Post-Stroke: Harnessing Adaptive Neuroplasticity- Friday, March 15, 8:00 AM- 12:00 PM   more info Ended $75.00 $5.12
Manual Therapy for the Older Adult with Painful Shoulder Conditions- Friday, March 15, 1:00 PM-5:00 PM   more info Ended $75.00 $5.12
Advanced Rehabilitation Technologies for Spinal Cord Injury Friday, March 15, 2013 1:00 PM- 5:00 PM   more info Ended $75.00 $5.12
The Effective Evaluation and Management of Concussions Saturday, March 16, 2013 8:00 AM- 12:00 PM   more info Ended $75.00 $5.12
Evidence Based Guidelines for Mobilizing Patients in the Acute and Critical Care Settings- Saturday, March 16, 8:00 AM- 12:00 PM   more info Ended $75.00 $5.12
Vestibular Rehabilitation: Management of the Dizzy Patient- Saturday, March 16, 2013 1:00 PM- 5:00 PM   more info Ended $75.00 $5.12
Therapeutic Exercise: Why, When and What Next? Saturday, March 16, 2012 1:00 PM- 5:00 PM   more info Ended $75.00 $5.12

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Event Details

Please choose the sessions that interest you from the list below. Two sessions will be offered at the same time, so please note times/dates when selecting the courses you wish to attend. 

Registration ends March 5, 2013. 

 


 

 

Course Title: Differential Diagnosis of Sinister Pathologies: Which Tests are Best?

Friday, March 15 8:00 AM- 12:00 PM

Course Presenter: Chad Cook, PT, PhD, MBA, FAAOMPT
Invited Audience: PT, PTA, OT, COTA, ATC

CEUs: 3.75 approved for OT, AT, PT

**LAB ATTIRE REQUESTED


Course Description: In clinical practice, physical therapists use tests and measures for a probabilistic approach to clinical decision making. This decision making approach requires that the tests and measures provide tangible value and can alter the post-test probability of diagnosis or prognosis. Recent evidence also dictates that selected tests should be used either early in the examination process to rule out contenders or late in the examination process to confirm hypotheses.  Use of diagnostic accuracy values such as sensitivity, specificity, and positive likelihood ratios has improved our ability to discriminate tests’ strengths. The focus of this course is to provide those tests and measures and the appropriate order within an examination that improves probability of a correct diagnosis or outcome.

Learning Objectives:

1)    Recognize and apply appropriate diagnostic accuracy measures for use in spot diagnosis (screening), differentiation, and confirmation.

2)    Utilize appropriate checklists to measure the strength of a test and measures’ accuracy scores.

3)    Perform the best tests and measures used during diagnosis and prognosis

4)    Integrate selected clinical findings into prognostic outcomes.

5)    Identify applications of prognosis that are useful in designing appropriate care plans for patients.

 

Course Schedule

7:45-8:00                     Course registration and sign in

8:00-9:00                     Probabilistic Decision Making for Differential Diagnosis

9:00-9:45                     Consequences of Medical Errors

9:45-10:00                   Break

10:00-10:40                 Spot Diagnosis/Screening Tests and Measures

10:40-11:20                 Best Neurological Tests

11:20-12:00                 Visceral Testing

 

Chad Cook, PT, PhD, MBA, FAAOMPT is a Professor and Chair at Walsh University. He is also a consulting associate professor at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina and the University of Otago, in New Zealand. Dr. Cook received his Bachelors of Science in Physical Therapy at Maryville University in 1990, a Masters of Business Administration in 1999, and a Doctorate of Philosophy (PhD) at Texas Tech University in 2003. He was certified as an orthopedic manual therapist in 2001, achieved APTA board certified orthopedic specialization in 2002, and received fellowship status at the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Therapy in 2006. Dr. Cook has published well over 140 peer reviewed papers and has two textbooks in their 2nd edition: Orthopedic Manual Therapy: An evidence based approach and Orthopedic Physical Examination Tests: An evidence based approach. Dr. Cook has published several book chapters in other textbooks and has presented internationally at over 140 presentations/conferences. He is the Editor in Chief of the Journal of Manual and Manipulative Therapy.  He has been a senior faculty and lecturer in peripheral and spine joint mobilization with Maitland Australian Physiotherapy Seminars for over 15 years. He is currently the treasurer of AAOMPT. Dr. Cook has won numerous awards locally at Duke for teaching, is a recent winner of the OPTP/JMMT literature review award in 2003 and 2005, was the 2009 winner of the top educator award for the American Physical Therapy Association, is the 2008 recipient of the Helen Bradley career achievement award and is the 2005 winner of the J Warren Perry Distinguished Authorship Award. He is also the 2011 Winner of the AAOMPT Excellence in Research Award.  

 


 

 

Course Title:  Optimizing Functional Recovery Post-Stroke:  Harnessing Adaptive Neuroplasticity

Friday, March 15 8:00 AM- 12:00 PM

Course Presenters: Susan Linder, PT, DPT, NCS and Maureen Whitford, PT, PhD, MS, MHS, NCS  

Invited Audience: PT, PTA, OT, COTA

CEUs: 3.75 approved for OT, PT  

Course Description 

Stroke prevalence and survival have increased over the last decade.  During this time period evidence has also shown that we as physical therapists can influence neuroplastic change and functional recovery after stroke to a significant degree.  This course is designed to update and inform course participants of recent evidence related to neuroplasticity post-stroke as well as generate ideas on how to implement these principles within clinical practice.  After taking this course, participants will have a foundational understanding of the principles of neuroplasticity as they relate to the rehabilitation of individuals post-stroke.  Additionally, they will be able to analyze how these principles are currently being implemented through the use of some common interventions, as well as critically appraise these interventions to choose the most optimal ones.  Ultimately, participants will be able to implement this foundational knowledge in their clinical decision-making and enhance current treatment options. 

 

Learning Objectives

1.)    Identify principles of neuroplasticity as they relate to functional motor recovery of patients post-stroke 

2.)    Critically appraise the integration of these principles of neuroplasticity within current rehabilitation interventions 

3.)    Integrate and apply the evidence into clinical decision-making

4.)    Utilize this foundational knowledge to enhance currently available therapeutic interventions

 

Course Schedule

7:45-8:00                     Course registration and sign in

8:00-9:00                     Review literature on neuroplasticity and motor learning principles to optimize motor recovery                       

9:00-10:00                   Critical review of rehabilitation interventions used with patients post-stroke          

10:00-10:15                 Break  

10:15-11:10                 Presentation of clinical case studies   

11:10-11:40                 Debate

11:40-12:00                 Summary and Q&A

 

Susan Linder PT, DPT, NCS

Susan Linder is a research physical therapist in the Neural Motor Control Lab at the Cleveland Clinic and an adjunct professor at Cleveland State University.  Susan received her Bachelors degree in Physical Therapy in 1993 from Cleveland State University, a Master’s degree in Health Science from the University of Indianapolis in 2004, and a Doctorate of Physical Therapy degree from D’Youville College in 2011.  She became Board Certified as a Specialist in Neurologic Physical Therapy in 2004.  Susan is the primary investigator on a study investigating the role of aerobic exercise on neuroplasticity post-stroke, she is the coordinator of a study investigating robotic-assisted therapy post-stroke, and a co-investigator in trials involving exercise and Parkinson’s disease, and concussion detection/management.  Susan has published on topics involving stroke rehabilitation and the role of exercise in Parkinson’s disease. She teaches part-time in the DPT program at Cleveland State University.

 

Maureen Whitford, PT, PhD, MS, MHS, NCS

Maureen Whitford is an Assistant Professor at Walsh University.  She also has a without compensation appointment as an Associate Researcher within the Motor Learning Lab at the Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center.  Dr. Whitford received her Bachelors of Science in Physical Therapy from The Ohio State University in 1993, a Master’s degree in Health Science from the University of Indianapolis in 2003, a Master’s degree of Science in Biokinesiology from the University of Southern California in 2007, and a PhD in Rehabilitation Science from the University of Minnesota in 2010.  She was awarded the Foundation for Physical Therapy McMillan Doctoral Scholarship in 2004, became certified as a neurologic clinical specialist in 2006, and was awarded a NIDRR Advanced Rehabilitation Research Training in Neurorehabilitation Postdoctoral Training Fellowship in 2011.  Dr. Whitford has published in the area of post-stroke recovery and motor control, and has presented posters nationally on this topic.  Dr. Whitford has had the opportunity to work on studies of post-stroke recovery within the research labs of several national experts in the field of neurorehabilitation.  Dr. Whitford has been involved in teaching within DPT programs for over 10 years, and has extensive clinical experience in the area of neurorehabilitation of both children and adults.  She is currently employed PRN at Aultman Woodlawn Rehab.

 


 

Walsh University: Manual Therapy for the Older Adult with Painful Shoulder Conditions

Friday, March 15 1:00 PM- 5:00 PM

Course Presenters: Megan Burrowbridge Donaldson, PT, PhD, FAAOMPT and Amy Hassen, PT, DPT, OCS, MTC

Invited Audience: PT, OT

** LAB ATTIRE REQUESTED

CEUs: 4 approved for OT, PT 

                     

Course Purpose:

By the year 2020 about 20% of the population, or an estimated 60 million people, will be aged 65 years or over. There is a high incidence and prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among older adults.  This increasing age leads to increasing vulnerability in the musculoskeletal system through injury and disease. Approximately 80% of those older persons will have musculoskeletal complaints and many of them will choose courses of rehabilitation to address pain or dysfunction. Older adults have changes in their bone and soft tissue quality that is different from ordinary orthopaedic patients, and therefore need special considerations when rehabilitating in outpatient clinics. Treating these musculoskeletal injuries and diseases in elderly people have now become major challenges for orthopedic clinicians.

The course will provide an introduction of the common clinical problems of aging-induced degenerative musculoskeletal diseases, osteoporosis, related fractures, and sarcopenia. The management model used in this course will emphasize the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) for patient care. This course provides evidence based recommendations for manual and exercise management for rehabilitation of geriatric patients with painful and stiff orthopaedic conditions of the shoulder.

Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of this course the participant will be able to:

  • Identify shoulder disorders/conditions with high prevalence and incidence common amongst older adults
  • Recognize the differential diagnoses and risk factors associated with common older adult pathologies and implications regarding treatment
  • Integrate the best evidence and ICF model when developing rehabilitation programs for older adult patients with common disorders of the shoulder.
  • Utilize specific manual techniques safely as learned in this course to reduce pain or dysfunction of older adult patients with shoulder conditions.

 

THE HIGHLIGHTS

Orthopaedic geriatric shoulder course

Evidence influenced approach to treatment

Hands-on learning lab opportunities

Review of shoulder conditions incidence and prevalence with older adults

Suggested manual therapy approaches (non-thrust) for the older adult

 

COURSE OUTLINE

12:45-1:00 Registration and sign-in

1:00-1:15 Clinical Relevance of this course

1:15-1:45 Incidence and prevalence of shoulder conditions with the older adult patient

1:45- 2:15 Differential diagnosis and risk factors screening

2:15- 3:00 Selected evidence based assessment methods (and special tests) for the geriatric shoulder

3:00-4:45 Focused ICF management with selected manual therapy approaches

4:45- 5:00 Wrap up and Summary

 

I. Incidence and Prevalence of shoulder conditions with the older adult patient

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Osteoporosis
  • Related Fracture
  • Sacropenia

II. Differential diagnosis and Risk factors screening

  • Referred pain from cervical spine
  • Related medical diagnoses
  • Screening activities

III. Evidence based examination and special tests for the shoulder

  • Examination process with associated tests for shoulder conditions (with clinical utility and sensitivity/specificity identified for decision making)

IV. Select Manual Therapy Interventions

  • Evidence based manual therapy (non-thrust) interventions to shoulder
  • Video demonstrations  and hands on manual application activities
  • Understanding the ICF for recovery
  • Adherence/Compliance strategies

V. Course Summary

  

Megan Burrowbridge Donaldson is an Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy at Walsh University, where she teaches medical screening, evidence based practice, and musculoskeletal examination and treatment in their DPT program. She earned her BS/ MS degrees at D’Youville College and her PhD from the Nova Southeastern University from Ft. Lauderdale FL.  She has completed her manual physical therapy fellowship program from Daemen College in Amherst, NY.  She remains active in clinical practice PRN in an outpatient clinic in Canton, Ohio. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists (FAAOMPT), and an active member of the Orthopaedic Section of the APTA.  She has been the nominating chair of the East Central District of the Ohio Chapter of the APTA (2007-2012), and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists (2012-present). She has several peer reviewed publications, a book chapter, and presents on manual therapy related topics nationally. 

 

Amy Hassen is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy at Walsh University where she is teaches lifespan and musculoskeletal courses and assists with clinical education. She earned her Certificate of Physical Therapy from Cleveland State University and a transitional Doctorate of Physical Therapy degree from the University of St. Augustine. Additionally, she has earned a Manual Therapy Certification from the University of St. Augustine and is a board certified Orthopaedic Clinical Specialist.

 


 

 Advanced Rehabilitation Technologies for Spinal Cord Injury

Friday, March 15 1:00 PM- 5:00 PM

Course Presenters: Lisa Lombardo, MPT and Martin Kilbane, PT, OCS

Invited Audience: PT, PTA, OT, COTA

CEUs: 4 approved for OT, PT

 

Course Description:  

Advanced rehab technologies for SCI will define what spinal cord injury is and help clinicians understand basic neuro-anatomy of the spinal cord and how it relates to physical and occupational therapy management.  In addition the course will cover advanced rehab technologies including gait training, FES, neural prosthesis, and robotics.  

Course Objectives: 

  • Participants will be able to describe the basic neuro-anatomy involved in spinal cord injury and how it relates to rehabilitation management (gait training).
  • Participants will be able to describe the current role of utilizing advanced rehab technologies in spinal cord injury rehabilitation including: FES, Neural Prostheses, and Robotics.          
  • Participants will gain understanding of the current research and practice of advanced rehab technologies and SCI.         
  • Participants will become familiar with a clinical algorithm to assess patients for the appropriateness of using advanced rehabilitation technologies.

                 

Course Schedule:  

1:00-2:00

  • Define SCI including neuro-anatomy
  • Neurologic Examination
  • Predicatability or Recovery

2:00-3:00

  • Gait training principals for SCI

3:00-4:00

  • FES and Neural Prosthesis

4:00-5:00

  • Robotics

 

Lisa Lombardo, MPT is a Research Clinical Coordinator at the Louis Stokes Cleveland VAMC.  Lisa received her Bachelor of Science Degree from the Ohio State University in 1994.  She is a graduate of Slippery Rock University’s Master of Physical Therapy program in 1997.  Lisa began her career at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation where she gained extensive experience in neuro rehab, pediatrics, acute care, and subacute care.  She was the Center Coordinator of Clinical Education and hosted numerous continuing education classes for staff.  In 2003 she moved to Minnesota and was a senior therapist at the Courage Center where she gained extensive experience working with individuals with spinal cord injury and brain injury.  She was adjunct professor for St Catherine University in St. Paul.

Lisa specializes in the treatment of individuals with spinal cord injury, stroke and multiple sclerosis.  She is certified in NDT. She is currently involved in numerous research projects involving the use of an implanted neuroprothesis and functional electrical stimulation to provide individuals with paralysis the ability to regain functions such as standing, stepping and seated stability.  Lisa is also currently a part time professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at Cleveland State University.  She has presented the research outcomes and courses on functional electrical stimulation numerous times at conferences.  Lisa is a member of International Functional Electrical Stimulation Society.  She is co-author of 5 publications in various journals.  


Martin J. Kilbane, PT, OCS is the Supervisor of SCI/D Rehab Therapies at the Louis Stokes Cleveland VAMC.   Marty received his Bachelor’s of Science Degree from Fordham University in 1996.   He is a graduate of Cleveland State University's Physical Therapy program in 2000, and he is currently enrolled in the transitional Doctorate of Physical Therapy Program at the University of Montana.

Marty joined the Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Administration Hospital Spinal Cord Injury/Disorders Service in September of 2006.  Prior to joining the Veterans Administration, Marty gained extensive experience in the area of orthopedics and sports medicine with clinical expertise in rehabilitation of spine, shoulder, and lower extremity dysfunction.  He became a Board Certified Clinical Specialist in Orthopedic Physical Therapy in 2007, and he continues to work part time for the Cleveland Clinic Foundation at Lakewood Hospital treating outpatient orthopedic patients.  

Over the past decade Marty has presented over thirty guest lectures on a variety of physical therapy rehabilitation topics with the focus of utilizing current evidenced based practice and research to improve clinical outcomes in spinal cord injury and orthopedics.  He is a co-author of five publications, and he is a guest instructor for the Doctoral of Physical Therapy Program at Walsh University.  

Marty is an elected board member of the National VA Physical Therapy Professional Standards Board as well as the Therapy Leadership Council in Spinal Cord Injury. This past year Marty was one of seven Physical Therapists throughout the entire VA system to be selected to serve on the National PT Strategic Planning Committee.


 The Effective Evaluation and Management of Concussions 

Saturday, March 16 8:00 AM- 12:00 PM

Course Presenter: Jenna Scholl, DPT

Invited Audience: PT and ATC

CEUs: 3.75 approved for AT, PT 

 

Course Description: 

This course will cover how to effectively evaluate and manage athletes who have sustained a concussion. Participants will be educated on how to successfully progress each athlete through the concussion “return to play” progression. Various topics including helmet safety, general concussion facts, Post Concussive Syndrome, Second Impact Syndrome, Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, concussions in the NFL, and research, literature, and legislation regarding concussions will be presented.

 

Learning Objectives: 

  • Distinguish the difference between concussion fact vs. fiction
  • Understand the overview of the medical management of a concussion
  • To effectively evaluate patients  with a concussion diagnosis
  • To understand and correctly progress an athlete through each phase of the concussion “return to play” progression
  • To gain knowledge of current research, literature, and legislation regarding concussions and the role of the physical therapist

Course Schedule: 

8:00am – 9:00am          

  • General Concussion Information
  • Concussions in the NFL
  • Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy
  • Second Impact Syndrome
  • Post Concussion Syndrome

 9:00am – 9:10am          

  • Break

 9:10am – 10:15am        

  • Concussion Evaluation

10:15am – 10:25am      

  • Break

10:25am – 11:30am        

  • Neuropsychological Testing
  • Concussion Management
  • Prevention
  • Legislation

11:30am – 12:00pm        

  • Questions and Discussion


Jenna Scholl graduated from Walsh University with a Bachelor’s Degree in Biology in 2008 and a Doctorate of Physical Therapy in 2010. Jenna has a heavy sports background and as a result, has developed a strong interest in the health of athletes, specifically related to concussions. She is currently the director of the Concussion Management Program at Genesis Rehabilitation in Zanesville Ohio.  She has also developed a Running Program and a Throwing Program at Genesis Rehabilitation and is certified in Sportsmetrics. 

 


 

Title: Evidence Based Guidelines for Mobilizing Patients in the Acute and Critical Care Settings

Saturday, March 16 8:00 AM- 12:00 PM

Course Presenter: Jaime C. Paz, PT, DPT, MS

Invited Audience: PT, PTA, OT, COTA 

CEUs: 3.75 approved for OT, PT 

 

Course description 

Recent literature in physical therapy and rehabilitation supports improved outcomes when patients are mobilized early during their inpatient hospital stay. Furthermore preventable morbidity such as skin breakdown, pneumonia and deep vein thrombosis have reimbursement implications. Therefore this course is designed to help clinicians in the inpatient care settings manage the vast amount of information and equipment involved in this environment. The focus will be on interpreting which lab values and diagnostic test results, based on current evidence, are most appropriate for safely mobilizing patients. Additionally a description of commonly encountered lines and tubes will be provided with associated precautions and considerations for patient care. Case scenarios will be implemented to integrate course material for practice application. At the end of this course the participant should be able to make better clinical decisions regarding mobilizing their patient in the acute and critical care settings. 


Learning objectives 

a) understand and interpret pertinent vital signs, diagnostic test and laboratory values of various patient presentations encountered in the inpatient setting

b) describe the indications, considerations and precautions when working with medical equipment such as lines and tubes 

c) improve clinical decision making processes in this patient population with current evidence to substantiate rationale


Course schedule

8:00 Introduction and Course overview

8:10 – 9:15 Indications, precautions and considerations for managing lines and tubes

9:15 – 9:25 break

9:25 – 11:00 Interpreting vital signs, lab values & diagnostic tests

11:00 – 11:10 break

11:10 – 12:00 Case scenarios

 

Jaime C. Paz PT, DPT, MS is currently a Clinical Professor and Associate Chair at Walsh University Division of Physical Therapy in North Canton, OH. He has presented at multiple conferences on the topic of managing the medically complex patient. Dr. Paz has published the “Acute Care Handbook for Physical Therapists” by Butterworth Heinemann in 1997. A fourth edition is expected to be published by Elsevier Saunders in 2013.

Dr. Paz also has several peer reviewed publications and presentations concerning topics on patient management in the acute care setting. Prior to coming to Walsh, he was an Associate Clinical Professor at Northeastern University as well as adjunct faculty member at Simmons College in Boston.  Primary teaching responsibilities include; Clinical Medicine, Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy and Clinical Integration with a focus on a Review of Systems.

 


 

Vestibular Rehabilitation: Management of the Dizzy Patient

Saturday, March 16 1:00 PM- 5:00 PM

Course Presenters: Amy Cassady, PT, Kay Cherian, PT, MPT, Cert MDT and

Cynthia Skrabski, PT

Invited Audience: PT, PTA, OT, COTA, ATC

CEUs: 3.75 approved for OT, AT, PT 

 

Course Description:

 “Vestibular Rehabilitation: Physical Therapy Management of the Dizzy Patient” is designed to introduce participants to assessment and treatment approaches to patients with dizziness and/or imbalance due to vestibular system dysfunction.  “Vestibular vertigo accounts for one-third of dizziness/vertigo symptoms in the medical setting.” (Neuhauser 2008).  According to the NIDCD, “Overall, the cost of medical care for patients with balance disorders exceeds $1 billion per year in the United States.”  

Individuals with vestibular dysfunction may experience reduction in functional activity level and an increased risk for falls.  Physical therapists are in a unique position to address the impairments related to vestibular dysfunction.  Being able to correctly identify and treat vestibular dysfunction is critical to adequate management of these individuals.  This evidence-based course is intended to provide the participant with basic knowledge of the vestibular anatomy and physiology, normal and abnormal function of the vestibular system, common vestibular diagnoses, as well as decision making skills for the assessment and treatment of individuals with vestibular disorders

Course Objectives:  

  • Identify anatomy and physiology of the peripheral and central vestibular system.
  • Differentiate between peripheral and central vestibular disorders. 
  • Describe assessment of the vestibular patient, including outcome measures.
  • Describe sign/symptoms and testing for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV), including treatment for posterior canal BPPV. 
  • Describe exercise programs for patients with peripheral and central vestibular disorders.  

 

Course Schedule:  

1:00- 2:30              

  • Introduction
  • Sensory systems used in balance
    • Vestibular system: anatomy and physiology
    • Cervical spine
  • Vestibular disorders
  • Assessment of the vestibular patient 

2:30- 2:45                

  • Break 

2:45-4:00  

  • BPPV 
  • Treatment of peripheral and central vestibular patients 

4:00- 4:45                

  • Lab: BPPV, basic assessment of the cervical spine 

4:45- 5:00               

  • Questions

 

Amy Cassady PT graduated from Bowling Green State University in consortium with the Medical College of Ohio in 1991 with a Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy.  She has worked in a variety of settings including acute care and acute rehabilitation and is currently working in outpatient at The Cleveland Clinic.  She specializes in care of patients with neurologic, lower extremity amputation, and vestibular disorders.  She was certified in Vestibular Rehabilitation in 2000.  Additionally, she is NDT certified and is an APTA credentialed clinical instructor.  She has been a guest lecturer at Cleveland State University and has presented lectures at multi-disciplinary vestibular courses at The Cleveland Clinic. 


Kay Cherian PT, MPT, Cert. MDT graduated from Nova Southeastern University in 1998 with a Masters in Physical Therapy. She was certified in Vestibular Rehabilitation in 2000 and Mechanical Therapy and Diagnosis in 2005. She is currently practicing Physical Therapy at the Cleveland Clinic where her clinical interests include vestibular, cervical spine, headaches, tinnitus, and temporomandibular disorders. 


Cynthia Skrabski graduated from the University of Pittsburgh in 1973 with a Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy.  Additionally she earned her Masters of Public Administration with an emphasis in Health Care in 1981.  She currently works in outpatient orthopedics at the Cleveland Clinic in Sports Health.  Her clinical interests are in spine and vestibular disorders.  She obtained her Vestibular Rehabilitation certification in 2010.  


 

Therapeutic Exercise: Why, When and What Next? 

Saturday, March 16 1:00 PM- 5:00 PM

Course Presenters: Leigh Murray, PT, PhD and Elizabeth Narducci, PT, DPT

Invited Audience: PT, PTA, OT, COTA, ATC

CEUs: 4 approved for OT, AT, PT 

 

Course Description:

This course will review the physiological response of the body to immobilization and inactivity, the physiological basis for strength and balance training, and discuss examples of simple to complex therapeutic exercises that apply to various areas of the body.  A review of the ICF model and its application to therapeutic exercise choices will be covered in addition to the current evidence that supports clinical exercise choices.  Attendees will apply this information to case studies by creating therapeutic exercise programs and discuss appropriate progression of these activities in order to return the patients to optimal function.


Learning objectives: 

a.    Review the physiological effects of inactivity or immobilization on the musculoskeletal and nervous system.

b.   Review the physiological basis for strength and balance training

c.    Review the ICF model and the role it plays on decision-making regarding therapeutic exercise

d.   Review the evidence that supports standard therapeutic exercise choices made by clinicians

e.    Determine the appropriate therapeutic exercise program and progression of that program based on patient case information


Course schedule: 

1:00 - 2:00 PM Review of the impact of inactivity/immobility on the neuromuscular system and the physiological/biomechanical basis of strength /balance training

2:00 - 3:00 PM Review of evidence related to strength and balance training

3:00- 5:00 PM Case studies and discussion of plan of care development and progression of exercises related to strength and balance training

 

Dr. Leigh Murray is a practicing physical therapist for the past 13 years and in addition to a Physical Therapy degree, her academic background has included a masters and PhD in Exercise Physiology.  She currently works in the Home Health setting on a part-time basis and has taught Foundations of Clinical Exercise, Biomechanics, and Musculoskeletal Impairments for physical therapy students at Walsh University for the past 7 years.  Her research focus is on the impact of exercise with special populations including the elderly and the cancer survivor.  

 

Elizabeth Narducci received her Bachelor’s degree in Biology from Kenyon College in 2007, as well as her Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Walsh University in 2011. She currently works at the Cleveland Clinic in the outpatient setting, and is attending Kent State as she works towards her PhD in Exercise Physiology.    

 

Have questions about Walsh University Division of Physical Therapy and the East Central District of the OPTA Present the Inaugural Spring Conference for Clinical Excellence? Contact the organizer

When & Where


Walsh University
2020 East Maple St.
Betzler Social and Behavioral Sciences Center
North Canton, OH 44720

Friday, March 15, 2013 at 8:00 AM - Saturday, March 16, 2013 at 5:00 PM (EDT)


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