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UIC 2013 Bilingual/ESL Teacher Training Summer Institute June 25-26

Chicago, United States

UIC 2013 Bilingual/ESL Teacher Training Summer...

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Next Generation Science Standards for ELLs: Part 1
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 (9:00AM- 12:00PM): Okhee Lee, New York University, NY Rita Januszyk, Gower District 62, Willowbrook, IL. The session highlights language demands and opportunities as English language learners (ELLs) engage in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). It consists of five parts. First, the NGSS are described with a focus on language demands and opportunities for ELLs. Second, using a case study, implementation of the NGSS with ELLs is discussed. Third, participants engage in a science activity and design effective strategies to implement the NGSS for ELLs in their own classrooms. Fourth, connections of NGSS to Common Core State Standards for English language arts and mathematics are considered. Finally, adoption of the NGSS in the State of Illinois and its implications for ELLs is addressed.
9 Tickets Free  
Next Generation Science Standards for ELLs: Part 2
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 (1:00PM - 4:00PM): Okhee Lee, New York University, NY Rita Januszyk, Gower District 62, Willowbrook, IL. The session highlights language demands and opportunities as English language learners (ELLs) engage in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). It consists of five parts. First, the NGSS are described with a focus on language demands and opportunities for ELLs. Second, using a case study, implementation of the NGSS with ELLs is discussed. Third, participants engage in a science activity and design effective strategies to implement the NGSS for ELLs in their own classrooms. Fourth, connections of NGSS to Common Core State Standards for English language arts and mathematics are considered. Finally, adoption of the NGSS in the State of Illinois and its implications for ELLs is addressed.
8 Tickets Free  
From Besitos to Gimme Some Sugar
Wednesday, June 26, 2013 (9:00AM-12:00PM): Anne H. Charity Hudley, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA. Students whose language varies from what is expected at school often face challenges achieving in schools for reasons that are related to culture, language, and inequality. There remains a significant need for educators and linguists to work together to develop realistic, practical, and easy-to-implement classroom strategies that are both linguistically and educationally informed to help these students overcome educational challenges and succeed. Educators and linguists must also engage in community outreach that addresses the specific needs of students and families within schools and communities. In this presentation, I demonstrate why greater awareness about language variation—both within and across languages, language attitudes, culture, and the role they play in educational inequality is needed with respect to varieties of English that are spoken by African-American students and varieties of Spanish and English that are spoken by Latin@ students. I will focus on the assessment of students across content areas, including language arts and STEM classes, and will discuss disciplinary challenges that can arise due to miscommunications in the classroom.
39 Tickets Free  
Reading the World in Spanglish
Wednesday, June 26, 2013 (1:00PM-4:00PM): Ramón Antonio Martínez, University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Martínez studies the hybrid language practices of bilingual youth, as well as their beliefs, feelings, and awareness—or language ideologies—with respect to these practices. He will discuss his study of Spanish-English code-switching, or use of “Spanglish” by middle school bilingual Latina/o students in East Los Angeles. Dr. Martínez argues that students use Spanglish in creative, skillful, and intelligent ways, and that their use of Spanglish contributed to the construction of a social space in the classroom where bilingualism and hybridity were normative. Analysis revealed parallels between the skills embedded in students’ use of Spanglish and the skills that they were expected to master according to California’s sixth-grade English Language Arts standards. Students’ use of Spanglish displayed a mastery of specific academic literacy skills, including adeptness at (1) shifting voices for different audiences, and (2) communicating shades of meaning. Dr. Martínez theorizes that students’ skillful use of Spanglish could be leveraged as a resource for helping them to develop academic literacy skills, as well as to create opportunities for rich and transformative dialogue that could potentially help students develop critical language awareness.
39 Tickets Free  

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Event Details

2013 Bilingual/ESL SUMMER INSTITUTE
For Teachers & Teacher Candidates Serving
English Language Learners

 

Tuesday, June 25th and Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

Four Sessions – 3 CPDUs per session for Illinois teachers

9:00 A.M. – 12:00 noon and 1:00 P.M. - 4:00 P.M. each day

Breakfast: 8:30 A.M. - 9:00 A.M. 

University of Illinois at Chicago

The UIC Forum

725 W. Roosevelt Rd. 

For directions to the UIC Forum:

http://www.uic.edu/depts/uicforum/directions.shtml

 

Parking available (on your own) located two blocks west of the UIC Forum at 1135 S. Morgan St. Lot 5.

 

No attendance fee, but registration and tickets are required.

 

Co-sponsored by:

University of Illinois at Chicago
Bilingual Education/ESL Teacher Training Program
 

and

Chicago Public Schools

Funded by:

National Professional Development Grants Program

Office of English Language Acquisition                         U.S. Department of Education


Session Descriptions

                                 DAY 1: Tuesday, June 25, 2013                    

9:00 am - 12:00 pm (Part 1) and 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm (Part 2)

  

Next Generation Science Standards for English Language Learners, Parts 1 & 2

Okhee Lee, New York University, NY 

                           Rita Januszyk, Gower District 62, Willowbrook, IL                              

The session highlights language demands and opportunities as English language learners (ELLs) engage in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). It consists of five parts. First, the NGSS are described with a focus on language demands and opportunities for ELLs. Second, using a case study, implementation of the NGSS with ELLs is discussed. Third, participants engage in a science activity and design effective strategies to implement the NGSS for ELLs in their own classrooms. Fourth, connections of NGSS to Common Core State Standards for English language arts and mathematics are considered. Finally, adoption of the NGSS in the State of Illinois and its implications for ELLs is addressed.

 About The Presenters:

Okhee Lee is a professor in the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University. Her research areas include science education, language and culture, and teacher education. Her research involves the scale-up of a curricular and teacher professional development intervention to promote science learning and language development of English language learners. She is currently a member of the design team to develop the Next Generation Science Standards through Achieve Inc. and the Steering Committee for the Understanding Language Initiative at Stanford University.  She was a 2009 Fellow of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), received the Distinguished Career Award from the AERA Scholars of Color in Education in 2003, and was awarded a 1993-95 National Academy of Education Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship.

Rita Januszyk is a 4th grade teacher in Gower District 62 in Willowbrook, IL. Her responsibilities have included teaching in grades K through 5 and serving as the District's Science Coordinator and Enrichment Coordinator. She received a B.S in Biological Science from the University of Illinois at Chicago, was a scientific assistant at Argonne National Laboratory, and received a master's degree in Elementary Education from Northern Illinois University. More recently, Ms. Januszyk was a presenter at the Illinois Reading Council and Illinois Science Teacher Association Conferences. She is on the writing team for the Next Generation Science Standards and the Science Adoption Leadership Team for the Illinois State Board of Education.

 

 

Day 2: Wednesday, June 26, 2013         

9:00 am – 12:00 pm

 

From Besitos to Gimme Some Sugar: Cross-Linguistic Lessons from African-American and Latin@ students 

Anne H. Charity Hudley, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 

Students whose language varies from what is expected at school often face challenges achieving in schools for reasons that are related to culture, language, and inequality. There remains a significant need for educators and linguists to work together to develop realistic, practical, and easy-to-implement classroom strategies that are both linguistically and educationally informed to help these students overcome educational challenges and succeed. Educators and linguists must also engage in community outreach that addresses the specific needs of students and families within schools and communities. In this presentation, I demonstrate why greater awareness about language variation—both within and across languages, language attitudes, culture, and the role they play in educational inequality is needed with respect to varieties of English that are spoken by African-American students and varieties of Spanish and English that are spoken by Latin@ students. I will focus on the assessment of students across content areas, including language arts and STEM classes, and will discuss disciplinary challenges that can arise due to miscommunications in the classroom.

 About The Presenter:

Anne Harper Charity Hudley is Associate Professor of English, Education, Linguistics, and Africana Studies and the William & Mary Professor of Community Studies at the college of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. She directs the William and Mary Scholars Program and co-directs the William & Mary Scholars Undergraduate Research Experience (WMSURE). Her research and publications address the relationship between English language variation and K-16 educational practices and policies. Charity Hudley's first book, Understanding English Language Variation in U.S. Schools, co-authored with Christine Mallinson of UMBC was published in 2011 in the Teachers College Press Multicultural Education Series. Her second book, We Do Language: English Language Variation in the Secondary English Classroom, also co-authored with Mallinson will appear also with Teachers College Press in December 2013. Her current research, funded by the National Science Foundation, investigates how culturally- and socially-based language patterns affect teaching, learning, and student assessment in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) classrooms in the U.S. Charity Hudley has served as a consultant to the National Research Council Committee on Language and Education and to the National Science Foundation’s Committee on Broadening Participation in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) sciences. She is associate editor of Language with specific responsibilities for articles concerning the teaching of linguistics and is on the editorial boards of American Speech and the sociolinguistics division of Language and Linguistics Compass. She has worked with K-12 educators through lectures and workshops sponsored by the American Federation of Teachers and by public and independent schools throughout the country.  Dr. Charity Hudley earned a B.A. and an M.A. in Linguistics from Harvard University in 1998. She was awarded a Ford Pre-Dissertation Fellowship in 2003. From 2003-2005, she was the Thurgood Marshall Dissertation Fellow at Dartmouth College. She earned a Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Pennsylvania in 2005. She received a National Science Foundation Minority Postdoctoral Fellowship in Fall 2005 and a National Science Foundation Minority Research Starter Grant in 2009.

Day 2: Wednesday, June 26, 2013                

1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

 

Reading the World in Spanglish: Language and Critical Consciousness in Urban Schools 

Ramón Antonio Martínez, University of Texas at Austin  

Dr. Martínez studies the hybrid language practices of bilingual youth, as well as their beliefs, feelings, and awareness—or language ideologies—with respect to these practices. He will discuss his study of Spanish-English code-switching, or use of “Spanglish” by middle school bilingual Latina/o students in East Los Angeles. Dr. Martínez argues that students use Spanglish in creative, skillful, and intelligent ways, and that their use of Spanglish contributed to the construction of a social space in the classroom where bilingualism and hybridity were normative. Analysis revealed parallels between the skills embedded in students’ use of Spanglish and the skills that they were expected to master according to California’s sixth-grade English Language Arts standards. Students’ use of Spanglish displayed a mastery of specific academic literacy skills, including adeptness at (1) shifting voices for different audiences, and (2) communicating shades of meaning. Dr. Martínez theorizes that students’ skillful use of Spanglish could be leveraged as a resource for helping them to develop academic literacy skills, as well as to create opportunities for rich and transformative dialogue that could potentially help students develop critical language awareness.

About The Presenter:

Ramón Antonio Martínez is an assistant professor in Language and Literacy Studies in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Texas at Austin, where he serves as a faculty affiliate with Bilingual/Bicultural Education and the Center for Mexican American Studies. His research examines how the everyday language practices of Chicana/Chicano and Latina/Latino students overlap with the forms of academic language and literacy privileged in school settings.  In addition, Dr. Martínez explores how competing ideologies inform language policy and classroom practice in urban schools, and how students and teachers in those schools articulate, embody, and hallenge such ideologies in their everyday interactions.  Before earning his doctorate from the Division of Urban Schooling at the UCLA Graduate School of Education and nformation Studies, Dr. Martínez worked as an elementary school teacher and adult ESL teacher in the Los Angeles Unified School District.

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