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Psychotropic Medications in Youth: Seeking Effective Care but at What Cost? Presented by Robert Foltz, Psy.D.

The Institute for Professional & Continuing Studies

Thursday, July 10, 2014 from 8:30 AM to 4:00 PM (CDT)

Psychotropic Medications in Youth: Seeking Effective...

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General Admission Ended $159.00 $4.97
TCSPP Student Admission Ended $40.00 $1.99

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Event Details

Psychotropic Medications in Youth: Seeking Effective Care but at What Cost?

Presented by Robert Foltz, Psy.D.

Workshop Schedule:

8:30:  Doors open / Registration
9:00:  Session Begins:  Current Trends in Psychotropic Medication Use in Youth
10:00: ADHD & Its Treatment - Stimulants
11:00: Mood Disorders & their Treatment – Anticonvulsants & Antidepressants
12:00: Lunch on your own
1:00:  Mood Disorder Treatment, continued
2:00:  Antipsychotics in Youth
2:30   Break
3:00:  How do Adolescents feel being Medicated – Achieving optimal results?
4:00:  Session ends

CE Credit: 6
Fee: $159
Cancellation Policy: A 75% refund will be issued if cancelled one week or more in advance of the workshop


Presenter Bio

Robert Foltz is a clinical psychologist and Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology. Prior to teaching, Dr. Foltz spent over 20 years working in inpatient and residential treatment centers with severely troubled youth. Now in academia, Dr. Foltz teaches courses on Psychopathology, Advanced Psychopathology, Evidence-Based Treatments for Children & Adolescents, and Pediatric Psychopharmacology. He maintains a private practice working with adolescents, adults, and families. Dr. Foltz has multiple publications critically examining diagnostic constructs and the use of psychotropic medications in youth. Finally, Dr. Foltz is actively gathering data for the Adolescent Subjective Experience of Treatment study, surveying the perspectives of severely troubled youth currently placed in residential treatment settings.

Program Description

The use of psychotropic medications have become a mainstay in the treatment of emotionally and behaviorally troubled youth. The use of antipsychotic medications is becoming increasingly common in younger populations for a wider range of disorders. The U.S. currently uses approximately 75% of the world’s Ritalin supply. Indeed, the U.S. medicates more youth than any other country.   However, these trends are not without concerns:

     -Are these medication practices resulting in improved outcomes?
     -Are there potential side-effects that could interfere with long-term functioning?
     -Is there sufficient evidence-base to support our current practices?
     -How do youth feel about being medicated?
 
This program will explore the above questions and concerns. Current medication trends will be examined for many disorders of childhood and adolescences. In looking at these disorders, a selection of influential medications studies will be closely reviewed in the effort to analyze outcomes. A brief overview of medications’ “mechanisms of action” will be provided to establish a discussion about the use of multiple medications concurrently. Finally, results from the Adolescent Subjective Experience of Treatment (ASET) study will be explored to see how youth feel about being medicated.
Learning Objectives

After attending this workshop, attendees will be able to:
1. Describe the trends in current practice of utilizing psychotropic medications for child & adolescent disorders
2. List the different classes of medications commonly prescribed to youth
3. Analyze the weaknesses of the “evidence base” of our current medication practices represented through large scale, methodologically rigorous studies
4. Critique the complications of the common practice of polypharmacy and list the implications for multidisciplinary care
5. Describe the range of potential side-effects (behavioral, neurological, epigenetic, etc.) of common psychotropic medications.
6. Explain the adolescent experience of being medicated as revealed in extensive surveys completed in the Adolescent Subjective Experience of Treatment study.

Target audience: Psychologists, LCSWs, LCPCs, all mental health professionals
Psychologists. This program, when attended in its entirety, is available for 6 continuing education credits. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology maintains responsibility for this program and its content. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is committed to accessibility and non-discrimination in its continuing education activities. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is also committed to conducting all activities in conformity with the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles for Psychologists. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. If participants have special needs, we will attempt to accommodate them. Please address questions, concerns and any complaints to Moira Jackson 312-467-2364. All presenters will discuss the utility/validity of the content discussed including the validity and utility as well as the limitations of the approach and the most common (and severe) risks as relevant. There is no commercial support for this program nor are there any relationships between the CE Sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants, or other funding that could reasonably be construed as conflicts of interest.

References:
Comer, J. S., Olfson, M., & Mojtabai, R. (2010). National trends in child and adolescent
psychotropic polypharmacy in office-based practice, 1996–2007. Journal of the American
Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 49, 1001–1010. doi:10.1016/
j.jaac.2010.07.007.

Jensen, P. S., Arnold, L. E., Swanson, J. M., Vitiello, B., Abikoff, H. B., Greenhill, L. L., et
al. (2007). 3-year follow-up of the NIMH MTA study. Journal of the American Academy
of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 44, 213–235. doi:10.1097/CHI.
0b013e3180686d48.

Kranke, D., Floersch, J., Townsend, L., & Munson, M. (2010). Stigma experience among
adolescents taking psychiatric medication. Children and Youth Services Review, 32, 496
–505. doi:10.1016/j.childyouth.2009.11.002.

Mojtabai, R., & Olfson, M. (2010). National trends in psychotropic medication
polypharmacy in office-based psychiatry. Archives of General Psychiatry, 67, 26–36.
doi:10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2009.175.

Molina, B. S., Hinshaw, S. P., Swanson, J. M., Arnold, L. E., Vitiello,
B., Jensen, P. S., et al. (2009). The MTA at 8 years: Prospective follow-up of children
treated for combined-type ADHD in a multisite study. Journal of the American Academy
of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 48, 484–500. doi:10.1097/
CHI.0b013e31819c23d0.

Olfson, M., Crystal, S., Huang, C., & Gerhard, T. (2010). Trends in antipsychotic drug use
by very young, privately insured children. Journal of the American Academy of Child
and Adolescent Psychiatry, 49, 13–23. doi:10.1097/00004583-201001000-00005.
Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS) Team. (2009). The treatment
for adolescents with depression study (TADS): Outcomes over 1 year of naturalistic
follow-up. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 166, 1141–1149. doi:10.1176/
appi.ajp.2009.08111620.

Singh, M. K., & Chang, K. D. (2012). The neural effects of psychotropic medications in
children and adolescents. Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America,
21, 753–771. doi:10.1016/j.chc.2012.07.010.

Have questions about Psychotropic Medications in Youth: Seeking Effective Care but at What Cost? Presented by Robert Foltz, Psy.D.? Contact The Institute for Professional & Continuing Studies

When & Where


The Chicago School of Professional Psychology
325 N Wells St
Rooms 407 & 412
Chicago, IL 60654

Thursday, July 10, 2014 from 8:30 AM to 4:00 PM (CDT)


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