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Military and Veteran Behavioral Health Certificate Program (Entire Series)

The Post Graduate Center

Friday, October 17, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM (EDT)

Chester, PA

Military and Veteran Behavioral Health Certificate...

Registration Information

Registration Type Sales End Price Fee Quantity
Entire Series - Professionals
Must have at least a 2-year graduate degree in mental health (e.g., psychology, social work, counseling, marriage and family therapy). See details below.
Ended $1,060.00 $0.00
Entire Series - Widener Alumni, Widener Site Supervisors, and Widener Adjunct Faculty
See details below.
Ended $860.00 $0.00
Entire Series - Early Career Professionals
Professionals who have had their graduate degrees two years or less. See details below.
Ended $700.00 $0.00
Entire Series - Non-Widener Full-Time Students
Must provide a copy of a current and valid student photo ID. See details below.
Ended $500.00 $0.00
Entire Series - Widener Student & Faculty
Must provide a copy of a current and valid Widener Student/Faculty photo ID. See details below.
Ended $385.00 $0.00

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Event Details

Overview

More than 2.2 million American troops have served in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. These troops include greater numbers of women, parents of young children, and Reserve and National Guard members than in previous conflicts. Many have served longer deployments with shorter intervals at home between missions.

The Iraq war has ended and the Afghanistan war is coming to a close, but for many men and women in uniform, the fight continues as they transition home. Although the majority of returning Service members have adjusted well to post-deployment life, 44 percent have reported experiencing difficulties since returning home. It is not uncommon for them to face numerous readjustment challenges, including behavioral health problems such as traumatic brain injury (TBI), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression or substance abuse. Family members, too, are affected as they work to reconnect with their loved ones, some of whom have deployed multiple times. In 2010, nearly 300 Service members committed suicide and about half of those Service members had deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan.

We have learned from past wars that identifying and tackling combat stress injuries early is vital for overcoming them. In this environment, local communities across the country are charged with doing more to reach out and shore up our newest generation of warriors and their families. Despite this growing need, few U.S. graduate programs offer intensive training or certificates on how to provide quality and culturally-competent mental health care to Service members, Veterans and their families.

Against this backdrop, the Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP) at the Uniformed Services University (USU) has established the Military and Veteran Behavioral Health Post-Master’s Certificate Program to teach best clinical practices to mental health professionals. Through this specialized training offered at Widener University, providers gain knowledge and skills to address the emotional struggles and psychological health needs of military personnel, Veterans and their families. This intensive program covers key topics identified by mental health experts in the field, such as military culture, the deployment cycle, sleep problems, depression and suicidal risk, and blast-related TBI. For the first time, the program will include sessions on alcohol and drug use in Veterans, ethical considerations for working with Veterans, and military sexual assault, as well as Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) for treatment of PTSD. An increasing number of clinicians are using this gold standard, evidence-based therapy to reduce PTSD in our military and veteran population.

The program is presented by the Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP), Uniformed Services University (USU), and the Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Inc.


Military and Veteran Behavioral Health (MVBH) Post-Master’s Certificate Program  | Widener University | Chester, PA | October 17 & 18, 2014 | November 14 & 15, 2014 | December 5 & 6, 2014

If you currently treat or are interested in providing services to military personnel and their families, attend Widener University’s Military and Veteran Behavioral Health Post-Master’s Certificate Program. This specialized training opportunity is one of only a few military certificate programs offered in the nation. Training is offered over 3 weekends to minimize disruption to your work schedule.

The 10 training sessions include: Military Culture and Terminology  |  The Deployment Cycle and Its Impact on Service members and Their Families  |  The Unique Challenges of Military Families  |  Overview of Insomnia and Deployment-Related Sleep Disturbances  |  Overview of Traumatic Brain Injury in the Military  |  Alcohol and Drug Use in Military Veterans  |  Assessment and Treatment of Depression and Suicidal Behavior Associated with Military Deployment: An Overview  |  Sexual Assault in the U.S. Military  |  Ethical Considerations for Working with Military Members and Veterans  |  Evidence-Based Treatment of PTSD: Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) (2 days)


Program Format and Benefits: 40 CE credits of approved workshop hours | Attendance required at all 10 training sessions | Completion in 3 months over 3 weekend workshops | Awarded Certificate in Military and Veteran Behavioral Health upon completion


Past Participants’ Testimonials

“I thought the program was well thought out and executed. The staff was terrific and quite knowledgeable.” | “Very well prepared and very insightful. Great use of resources.” | “All were very good! Really enjoyed the training on how to provide treatment (sleep disturbance and PE)” | “CDP presenters were excellent - so knowledgeable.” | “Very knowledgeable and extremely professional, and they really took time to answer all of the students' questions.” |  “Amazing job, you all are masters of your trade.” | “Enjoyed all the presenters and learned a lot. “


For more information about program costs and registration, please contact Widener University at clinicalpsychologypgc@mail.widener.edu. To learn more about the curriculum, please contact the Center for Deployment Psychology at pdomenici@deploymentpsych.org. Active Duty mental health professionals interested in enrolling in this program should contact the Center for Deployment Psychology to inquire about other trainings developed specifically for them.

For disability accommodations or questions about accessibility please contact  Carol Bricklin at 610-499-1208 or cebricklin@widener.edu

Widener University's Institute for Graduate Clinical Psychology is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Widener University's Institute for Graduate Clinical Psychology maintains responsibility for this program.


Program Schedule

Workshop Series I (OCT 17-18)  

Friday October 17 | Location: Old Main Annex

9:00 am – 11:30 am

Military Culture and Terminology

11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Lunch (on your own)

12:30 pm – 4:30 pm

The Deployment Cycle and Its Impact on Service members and Their Families

 

Saturday, October 18 | Location: Old Main Annex

9:00 am – 11:30 am

The Unique Challenges of Military Families

11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Lunch (on your own)

12:30 pm – 2:30 pm

Overview of Insomnia and Deployment-Related Sleep Disturbances

2:30 pm – 2:45 pm

Break

2:45 pm – 4:45 pm

Overview of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in the Military

 Workshop Series II (NOV 14-15)

Friday, November 14 | Location: University Center, Webb Room

9:00 am – 11:30 am

Alcohol and Drug Use in Military Veterans

11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Lunch (on your own)

12:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Assessment and Treatment of Depression and Suicidal Behavior Associated with Military Deployment: An Overview

 

Saturday, November 15 | Location: University Center, Webb Room

9:00 am – 11:30 am

Sexual Assault in the U.S. Military

11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Lunch (on your own)

12:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Ethical Considerations for Working with Military Members and Veterans

 Workshop Series III (DEC 5-6)

Friday, December 5 | Location: University Center, Webb Room

8:30 am – 5:00 pm

Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT)

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Lunch (on your own)

 

Saturday, December 6 | Location: University Center, Webb Room

8:30 am – 5:00 pm

Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT)

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Lunch (on your own)

*Additional breaks will be assigned and are not reflected in the schedule*


Training Session Descriptions

The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Rd., Bethesda, MD 20814-4799 is the awarding and administering office for award # HU0001-06-1-0003. This project is sponsored by the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS); however, the information or content and conclusions do not necessarily represent the official position or policy of, nor should any official endorsement be inferred on the part of, USUHS, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government.

Friday, October 17 | Course: Military Culture and Terminology: Enhancing Clinical Competence

Description: This training module is for civilian mental health providers who want to develop a better understanding about how the military works and who comprises the armed forces.  It provides an overview of military culture to include basics about its history, organizational structure, core values, branches of the service, mission, and operations, as well as the differences between the Active and Reserve components.  Participants acquire greater competency in working with Service members by learning military culture and terminology, and discussing how aspects of the military culture impact behaviors and perspectives.

 Learning Objectives: 1) Establish a functional understanding of military culture. 2) Develop a comfort level with the organization, structure, branches, and subcultures of the military. 3) Understand cultural elements that identify a Service member as a member of the military culture. 4) Become familiar with military language and terminology.

Friday, October 17 | Course: The Deployment Cycle and Its Impact on Service members and Their Families

Description: This training module is intended to provide civilian mental health providers with an overview of the demographics of military families and the impact of the deployment cycle on the Service member and family unit.  It explores the unique experiences that Service members and their spouses and children face across the deployment cycle by examining research findings and psychosocial stressors associated with stages of the deployment cycle.  Strategies for promoting family resilience during separation and reintegration are discussed.

Learning Objectives: 1) Describe the demographic landscape of Service members and their military families.  2) Identify several stressors faced by Service members before deploying, during deployment, and after deployment. 3) Identify several stressors faced by family members before a loved one deploys, during his /her deployment, and after his/her return home. 4) Examine adaptive skills used by Service members while in a combat zone that may be maladaptive when applied at home after deployment. 5) Summarize strategies for facilitating healthy and positive reintegration for Service members.

Saturday, October 18 | Course: The Unique Challenges of Military Families

Description: This training module provides civilian mental health providers with an overview of the unique characteristics of military family life.  It reviews the demographics of military families, describes military marriages and the impact of military life on child development, explores the impact of deployments on military families, and highlights risk and resiliency factors in military families.  Strategies for working with military families are also discussed.

Learning Objectives: 1) Examine the demographics of military families. 2) Learn how military family life is different from civilian life. 3) Review the impact of deployments on couples and families. 4) Identify risk and resiliency factors in military families.

Saturday, October 18 | Course: Overview of Insomnia and Deployment-Related Sleep Disturbances

Description: This training module examines theories about sleep, its regulation and architecture, and the behavioral model of insomnia.  Rates of sleep problems in the military population and sleep disturbance after deployment are discussed including sleep problems found in PTSD and TBI. Basic knowledge for assessing sleep disruption and insomnia is provided.  The focus is then on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) with an overview of using sleep hygiene strategies, stimulus control, sleep restriction and cognitive components to address insomnia in a brief period of time.

Learning Objectives: 1) Describe the prevalence and kinds of sleep problems experienced by military personnel during and after deployment. 2) Identify insomnia and the symptoms associated with it. 3) Recognize the role of sleep disturbance in PTSD and TBI. 4) Examine different components of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I). 5) Gain familiarity with skills used in Stimulus Control and Sleep Restriction to treat insomnia as part of CBT-I.

Saturday, October 18 | Course: Overview of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in the Military

Description: This training module examines mechanisms of blast-related TBI and the signs, symptoms, severity ratings and rates of TBI in the military population.  We also provide a brief overview of the brain, TBI pathophysiology, and TBI assessment domains as well as screening consequences.  The workshop reviews complications following TBI, the overlap between TBI and PTSD, and resources for families and patients in the military with TBI. Videos are used to highlight key points about mild TBI.

Learning Objectives: 1) Identify the definition and meaning of TBI. 2) Recognize signs, symptoms and levels of blast-related TBI. 3) Differentiate mechanisms of injury including those for blast-related TBI. 4) Increase knowledge about TBI and its course, especially within the military/veteran population. 5) Identify resources available to Service members with TBI and their families.

Friday, November 14 | Course: Alcohol and Drug Use in Military Veterans

Description: This workshop briefly reviews the recent major recommendations and changes that will be implemented as a result of the Department of Defense (DOD) requesting the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to assess the adequacy of current substance use disorder treatment protocols across the DOD and all branches of the military. It then reviews the epidemiological evidence describing alcohol and drug use disorders and co-occurring psychiatric disorders in civilian and military populations. Commonly used brief assessment instruments for substance use disorders (SUDs) are described, as well as procedures for increasing the accuracy of self-reports. Evidence-based psychological and pharmacological treatments for SUDs are briefly described, ranging from brief interventions that can be incorporated as part of screening for appropriate cases to continuing care approaches for individuals with more severe and chronic problems. Particular attention is given to the importance of (a) taking a stepped care approach to the treatment of SUDs, (b) viewing SUDs on a continuum of severity, (c) using a motivational interviewing style of interacting with individuals with SUDs, and (d) using a relapse prevention and harm reduction approach in the treatment of SUDs.

Learning Objectives: 1) Briefly review major recommendations and resultant changes stemming from the DOD’s request of the IOM to assess the adequacy of current protocols across the DOD and all military branches. 2) Learn methods of brief screening for possible SUDs and the utility of brief interventions for individuals who screen positive. 3) Gain familiarity with evidence-based psychological and pharmacological treatments for SUDs. 4) Understand the importance of how to use a motivational style with individuals who might have an alcohol or drug problem. 5) Recognize the co-occurrence of psychiatric disorders with SUDs.

Friday, November 14 | Course: Assessment and Treatment of Depression and Suicidal Behavior Associated

                                        with Military Service: An Overview

Description: This training begins with a discussion about the challenges of working with depressed and suicidal patients and then reviews rates of depression and suicide in the public and military population. Next, theories on the etiology of depression and the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide are explained from the lens of the military culture, followed by an overview of the depressive disorders and suicide risk factors, warning signs and protective factors particularly as they pertain to military veterans.  The training then addresses the assessment of depression and suicidal risk beginning with a review of self-report assessment tools for each.  The Fluid Vulnerability Theory is then explained as a framework for assessing suicide risk at initial interview and throughout treatment.  Key concepts presented in this section are baseline risk and acute risk, including a continuum of acute risk that describes mild, moderate and high suicide risk.  Thereafter, various evidence-based treatments for depression are enumerated with a focus on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Cognitive Therapy, and Behavior Therapy and ways these approaches can be used with military veterans. Toward the end of the presentation, we introduce empirically-supported treatments for suicidal ideation and behavior (Dialectical Behavior Therapy, Means Restriction and Cognitive Therapy), and review in detail Cognitive Therapy. The presentation concludes with a brief review of promising treatment approaches for suicidal behavior (the Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality, SAFE VET, and Means Restriction Counseling).

Learning Objectives: 1) Identify risk factors, warning signs, and protective factors as they pertain to suicide risk within the context of the military population. 2) Examine theories on the etiology of depression as well as the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide and the Fluid Vulnerability Theory as they relate to suicide risk with a focus on the military population. 3) Review instruments used to assess depression and suicidal ideation and behavior. 4) Apply a risk continuum to the assessment of suicidal risk. 5) Review empirically-supported and promising treatments used to treat depression and suicidal ideation and behavior and their use with military veterans.

Saturday, November 15 | Course: Sexual Assault in the United States Military

Description: Military sexual assault (MSA) has garnered significant attention recently. This presentation reviews the prevalence of sexual harassment and unwanted sexual contact in the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs.  This workshop delineates some of the unique factors which contribute to the impact of sexual harassment and sexual assault on Service members.  These factors are organized into individual factors, the nature of the trauma itself and the environment in which the trauma occurs.  Clinical issues unique to Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (IOF/OEF) Veterans as well as male sexual assault and harassment survivors are reviewed. This presentation will review clinical presentation of MSA survivors who report repeated traumatization. Information regarding clinical disorders will focus on PTSD, major depressive disorder and death by suicide. Best practice for treatment of PTSD and major depressive disorder will be reviewed. Assessment of suicide risk will be briefly summarized.

Learning Objectives: 1) Identify military sexual assault (MSA) in clinical settings. 2) Enumerate clinical disorders which are mostly likely to impact functioning following MSA. 3) List three clinical symptoms that are frequently displayed by MSA survivors. 4) List three clinical issues specific to male survivors of MSA.

Saturday, November 15 | Course: Ethical Considerations for Working with Military Members and Veterans

Description:  Civilian mental healthcare providers working with military Service members and Veterans often face ethical challenges unique to this population. Personal and professional ethical practice is contingent on effective application of personal and cultural morals and professional regulations and expectations. Comprehensive understanding of informed consent, boundaries of cultural and clinical competence, disposition-driven diagnoses, multiple relationships, and professional fitness are all discussed in breadth and depth in the context of civilian practitioners working with military-connected clients. Decision-making models are presented to address ethical dilemmas, with specific discussion of the role of dual-relationships within a clinical framework. Extensive, complex vignettes are discussed in workshop/group format to ensure comprehensive, nuanced discussion. This presentation is augmented by videos designed to prompt discussion and examples of applied ethical principles.

Learning Objectives: 1) Distinguish an ethical dilemma from an ethical conflict. 2) Discuss and implement into practice a model for ethical decision-making based out of forensic psychology. 3) Discuss and implement into practice Gottlieb’s model for avoiding dual relationships. 4) Identify and discuss ethical challenges facing clinicians working with military members and veterans. 5) Demonstrate clinician’s own ethical decision making skills and processes through interactive discussion of case examples during the presentation.

Friday, December 5 | Course: Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT)

Description: This intensive 2-day module provides training in CPT, an evidence-based cognitive-behavioral treatment for PTSD described in the guide, Cognitive Processing Therapy, Veteran/Military Version – Therapist’s Manual by Resick et al., 2008. Videotaped examples of CPT cases are used to demonstrate therapist skills. Participants are expected to do role-plays in class to practice CPT techniques, and they must attend both days in their entirety. To encourage maximum benefit, participants will be strongly encouraged to take an online course at no additional cost before taking CPT. More details will be provided after registration.

Learning Objectives: 1) Describe symptoms of PTSD through the lens of CPT theory. 2) Identify some of the empirical evidence of CPT’s effectiveness in reducing PTSD. 3) Identify comorbid psychological disorders, and personality and environmental factors. 4) Describe methods of assessing CPT treatment effectiveness.    5) Implement the CPT standard protocol with individual patients diagnosed with PTSD. 


Program Faculty

David S. Riggs, Ph.D. is the Executive Director of the Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP) at the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, Maryland.  As CDP’s Executive Director, he oversees the development and delivery of training seminars to behavioral health professionals to prepare them to provide for the needs of warriors and their families.             

Dr. Riggs earned his Ph.D. at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and completed a clinical psychology internship at the Medical University of South Carolina. Prior to taking the position with the CDP, Dr. Riggs held clinical research positions at the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety at the University of Pennsylvania and the National Center for PTSD at the Boston VA Medical Center.

As a clinical and research psychologist, much of Dr. Riggs’ work has focused on trauma, violence and anxiety with a particular interest in the impact of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other anxiety disorders on the families of those directly affected. Over the past 20 years, he has trained and supervised numerous student and mental health professionals from the United States and other countries in techniques for treating PTSD, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and other anxiety disorders. This included training professionals in ways to address the emotional and psychological needs of survivors of combat, international terror, the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, Hurricane Katrina, and sexual and physical assault.

Dr. Riggs has published more than 60 articles and book chapters and presented more than 200 papers and workshops on topics including PTSD, domestic violence, and behavioral therapy.

Carin M. Lefkowitz, Psy.D., is a clinical psychologist and cognitive behavioral therapy trainer at the Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP) at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. Dr. Lefkowitz earned her M.A. and Psy.D. in clinical psychology at Widener University, with a concentration in cognitive-behavioral therapy.

Prior to joining the CDP, she served as a psychologist at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center.  In this capacity she provided individual and group psychotherapy with a focus on evidence-based treatments for PTSD and insomnia.  She also served as a clinical supervisor to Vet Center clinicians, and psychology interns and practicum students at the Medical Center. Dr. Lefkowitz has published peer-reviewed articles on prolonged exposure therapy for PTSD and was a therapist on studies of evidence-based treatments for insomnia.  She also coordinated the Medical Center's Cognitive Processing Therapy program.

Dr. Lefkowitz maintains adjunct instructor appointments with graduate psychology programs at Widener University and Chestnut Hill College, and was previously a Clinical Associate of the University of Pennsylvania's department of psychiatry.

Holly N. O’Reilly, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist and Lead, Traumatic Stress and Sexual Assault at the Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP) at the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, Maryland. Dr. O’Reilly earned her M.A. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology with a minor in Women’s Studies from Northern Illinois University.  While completing her dissertation on posttraumatic stress disorder, she served as a project manager at the National Center for PTSD, Women’s Health Sciences Division.  Dr. O’Reilly completed her trauma track residency at the Charleston Consortium and completed rotations at the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center.  She also was a post-doctoral fellow at the Center for the Treatment and Study of Traumatic Stress.

Prior to joining CDP, she served as the lead psychologist for a residential PTSD program at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center.  Additionally, she worked in private practice and at the mental health clinic at Wright Patterson Air Force Base as a staff psychologist. While at Wright Patterson, she worked with Service members and their families and also provided clinical training and supervision to military residents in psychology, social work and psychiatry.

Dr. O’Reilly has served as a researcher or research clinician on several PTSD treatment studies and specializes in cognitive-behavioral treatments for trauma survivors.  Her professional interests focus on the full spectrum of trauma recovery including: assessment and treatment of PTSD, sleep disturbance following trauma exposure, treatment of borderline personality disorder, gender studies and the consequences of repeated trauma exposure.

Laura Copland, MA, LCMHC is a senior PTSD treatment trainer with a focus on Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT), at the Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP) at Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, Maryland. She received her Master of Arts degree in counseling psychology from Antioch University New England.

Prior to joining CDP, Ms. Copland directed, designed and implemented state programs to assist active duty Service members, Veterans and their families during and post-deployments, including Maryland National Guard Outreach and Maryland's Commitment to Veterans. Additionally, she was a senior adjunct professor for five years in the Antioch University graduate psychology department.

Ms. Copland has more than 20 years of direct service experience working with military veterans and other survivors of trauma and acute and post-traumatic stress issues. She has trained both military and civilian professionals on working effectively with military behavioral health issues.

She was awarded the State of Maryland Meritorious Civilian Service Medal by the Maryland Army National Guard for her work in the design and implementation of the Reintegration and Yellow Ribbon program for all returning Maryland veterans and their families.

Have questions about Military and Veteran Behavioral Health Certificate Program (Entire Series)? Contact The Post Graduate Center

When & Where


Please see event description for workshop locations
University Center | Webb Room (**Workshop Series II and III only)
One University Place
Chester, PA 19013

Friday, October 17, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM (EDT)


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Organizer

The Post Graduate Center

The Post-Graduate Center* is the life-long learning arm of the Institute for Graduate Clinical Psychology at Widener University.

We are a leading source of quality continuing education programs in the Delaware Valley, with a reputation for:

  • Providing innovative, creative, and leading-edge materials to keep busy professionals up-to-date in various sub-fields of practice, education, and science. 
  • Actively engaging participants to enhance enjoyment and learning. 
  • Providing practical tools that busy professionals can incorporate 
    readily into their daily work.

The Institute for Graduate Clinical Psychology's Post Graduate Center at Widener University is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists.  The Insititute for Graduate Clinical Psychology's Post Graduate Center at Widener University maintains responsibility for this program.

Up-to-date information about all of our CE programs is available on our website at:

www.postgraduatecenter.org

_____________________________________________________________

Lodging

The Post-Graduate Center and thBest Western- Philadelphia Airport South at Widener University are in partnership. Please dial 610-872-8100 and mention that you are affiliated with the Widener Workshop for a discounted rate of $99/night and availability. For additonal information, please visihttp://www.bestwesternphiladelphiaairport.com/

_____________________________________________________________

CANCELLATION POLICIES

General

  • Individuals who cancel with more than 30 days notice will receive a full refund.
  • Individuals who cancel with less than 30 days but more than 24 hours notice will receive a partial refund (i.e., amount paid -  $10 processing fee)
  • Individuals who cancel with less than 24 hours notice will receive no refund.

For Military and Veteran Behavioral Health Certificate Program participants ONLY

  • Individuals who cancel with more than 30 days notice before the first workshop of the first series will receive a full refund.
  • Individuals who cancel with less than 30 days but more than 24 hours notice will receive a partial refund (i.e., amount paid -  $75 processing fee)
  • Individuals who cancel with less than 24 hours notice will receive no refund.

*Please note: These refund policies are for refunds issued through Eventbrite only. For a refund issued through the Post-Graduate Center, an additional fee may apply.

 

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The Post-Graduate Center is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Post-Graduate Center maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
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