Disciplining the Poor: Neoliberal Paternalism and the Persistent Power of Race

Minneapolis, MN

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Event Details

Disciplining the Poor: Neoliberal Paternalism and the Persistent Power of Race is the most recent book by author and professor Joe Soss. It highlights the changes in poverty governance over the past forty years and explains the central role of race in this evolution.

Join a discussion of Disciplining the Poor. Professor Soss will discuss the key themes from his new book and facilitate a panel discussion on the issue of poverty governance.



Panelists for the event include:

  • Tony Wagner, Executive Leadership Fellow, Humphrey School of Public Affairs

 


Schedule for the evening:

5:00 PM - 5:15 PM  Registration
5:15 PM - 6:15 PM  Panel Discussion and Q&A
6:15 PM - 7:00 PM  Social



This event is being hosted by the Humphrey School's Public and Nonprofit Leadership Center as part of its pubReads series. Contact Hunter Gordon at gordo430@umn.edu with any additional questions you may have.



About the Book:
Disciplining the Poor explains the transformation of poverty governance over the past forty years -- why it happened, how it works today, and how it affects people. In the process, it clarifies the central role of race in this transformation and develops a more precise account of how race shapes poverty governance in the post-civil rights era. Connecting welfare reform to other policy developments, the authors analyze diverse forms of data to explicate the racialized origins, operations, and consequences of a new mode of poverty governance that is simultaneously neoliberal -- grounded in market principles -- and paternalist -- focused on telling the poor what is best for them. The study traces the rolling out of this new regime from the federal level, to the state and county levels, down to the service-providing organizations and frontline case workers who take disciplinary actions in individual cases. The result is a compelling account of how a neoliberal paternalist regime of poverty governance is disciplining the poor today.